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  1. nininaz's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Hello Teachers,
    I am getting confused about using this kinf og grammar as following:

    Right about => You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Source:right - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online

    Could any one kindly describe why we use 'being' on such sentence? what is called such grammar rules?!
    is it gerund or participle?!

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    #2

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    Hello Teachers,
    I am getting confused about using this kind of grammar as followsing:

    Right about => You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Source:right - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online

    Could any someone kindly describe why we use 'being' in such a sentence? What is it called such in grammar rules?
    is it a gerund or a participle?!
    "Being" is used as a gerund which is a noun.

    You are right about something, the "something" being "the hotel being too crowded".
    I am not a teacher.

  2. nininaz's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    "Being" is used as a gerund which is a noun.

    You are right about something, the "something" being "the hotel being too crowded".
    Thanks for your reply and correcting me as well.
    Could you please give me a resource to fine more information about such a structure ?!I want to learn much about it.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    "Being" is used as a gerund which is a noun.
    I consider 'being' a present participle modifying 'hotel', the object of the preposition 'about'.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Grammarians have been discussing this for a long time There was a famous discussion of the topic between Jespersen and Fowler in the tracts of the Society for Pure English in the 1920s.

    I go with grammarians such as Aarts, Greenbaum, Huddleston , Pullum, Leech, Quirk, Svartik, etc, who see no piont in distinguishing between gerunds and participles.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 29-Aug-2016 at 11:45.

  5. nininaz's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Could you please give more examples like the sentence I mentioned? My problem has not been solved yet.
    I don't know how and when I can use that kind of a structure. It dosen;t make sentece to me.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 29-Aug-2016 at 11:45. Reason: Deleting quote.

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Do you mean something like the following?

    'It seems that the topic being discussed is of no interest to Piscean.'
    I am not a teacher.

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    You have a gerund in Italian called "gerundio composto" - the gerund plus a past particle.
    avendo parlato Having spoken, he left".
    essendo partito: "Having (Being) left, he walked home." (You use essere for movement verbs.)
    http://tutorino.ca/grammatica/2007/1...n-italian.html

    In English, we also use this structure in the following way: "You were right about him having left (essendo partito)."
    "Being crowded, the hotel was making a lot of money."
    A translator gives this for the original:
    "Avevi ragione circa l'hotel essere affollato." This uses the infinitive 'essere'. Is that a correct translation? We use the gerund there.
    Does this help?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 29-Aug-2016 at 23:01. Reason: Removed formatting to standardise font

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    #9

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    Hello Teachers,
    I am getting confused about using this kind of grammar as following:

    Right about => You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Source:right - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online

    Could any one kindly describe why we use 'being' on such sentence? what is called such grammar rules?!
    is it gerund or participle?!
    "You were right about [the hotel being too crowded]".

    As said earlier, for most purposes there is really no point in distinguishing gerunds and present participles, hence the term 'gerund-participle' used by some grammarians, or simply '-ing participle' by others. The most important thing is to determine the function of the word in the clause, and its category usually then becomes clear. In your example, there is a non-finite subordinate clause "the hotel being too crowded" functioning as complement to the preposition "about". The subordinate clause has a subject "the hotel" and a predicate "being too crowded". The head of a predicate is always a verb, and since "being" can be a verb, it is the only possible candidate for head, a function that we've just said can only be filled by a verb. So we've managed to identify both the function (head of the predicate) and category (verb) of the word "being" without any reference to, or knowledge of, the terms 'gerund' or 'participle'.

  8. nininaz's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: You were right about the hotel being too crowded.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You have a gerund in Italian called "gerundio composto" - the gerund plus a past particle.
    avendo parlato Having spoken, he left".
    essendo partito: "Having (Being) left, he walked home." (You use essere for movement verbs.)
    http://tutorino.ca/grammatica/2007/1...n-italian.html

    In English, we also use this structure in the following way: "You were right about him having left (essendo partito)."
    "Being crowded, the hotel was making a lot of money."
    A translator gives this for the original:
    "Avevi ragione circa l'hotel essere affollato." This uses the infinitive 'essere'. Is that a correct translation? We use the gerund there.
    Does this help?
    Thanks Raymott.

    You really gave me such a great clue to find out more information about such a structure that made me confused.
    Actually this kind of structure is called " possessive gerund " that is what I wanted to know.
    For every body who needs get far more information about it follow the bellow links:
    we can revise as follow:
    Formal :You were right about the (its)/hotel 's being too crowded.
    Informal:You were right about the hotel(it) being too crowded.
    Thanks agian for your great help.


    http://english.stackexchange.com/que...ive-determiner
    http://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/tpv...Dm90b7Xlw.html
    http://www.getitwriteonline.com/arch...asegerunds.htm
    Last edited by nininaz; 30-Aug-2016 at 08:45.

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