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    #1

    Expressing the position: the other end

    I am wondering the following expressions meaning the other end are correct and used both in the UK and the US:

    1. He sat down across the table from John.
    2. He sat down across from John.
    3. He sat down opposite to John.
    4. He sat down opposite John.
    5. He sat down opposite from John.
    6. He sat down on the opposite side of the table from John.
    7. He sat down on the opposite side of the table to John.
    8. He took a seat opposite to John.
    9. He took a seat opposite John.
    10. He took a seat opposite from John.



    I would also appreciate it if you could provide me with additional variations that are accepted by native speakers of English.

    Thank you for your attention.
    Last edited by inase; 01-Sep-2016 at 00:59.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    Assuming that John is sitting at one end of a table (at one short side of a long rectangular table), then none of those would work for me.
    "He sat at the opposite end of the table to John."

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    #3

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    If you mean 'He sat down directly facing John', please use Edit Post to number your sentences for our convenience in referring to them.

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    #4

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    Correction:
    "I am wondering if the following expressions meaning the other end are correct and used both in the UK and the US:"

    Question:
    If John is sitting at one longer side of a long rectangular table, do all the expressions listed make sense?

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    Assuming the arrangement in either picture A or picture B,

    Click image for larger version. 

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    then the following work for me in AmE, regardless of arrangement A or arrangement B.

    Quote Originally Posted by inase View Post

    1. He sat down across the table from John.
    2. He sat down across from John.
    3. He sat down opposite to John
    4. He sat down opposite John.
    5. He sat down opposite from John.
    6. He sat down on the opposite side of the table from John.
    7. He sat down on the opposite side of the table to John.
    8. He took a seat opposite to John.
    9. He took a seat opposite John.
    10. He took a seat opposite from John.

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    #6

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    Opposite John works better for me than opposite to John. The "to" is superfluous.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    They don't have to be exactly aligned to say "across from". For 'opposite', you can say "directly across from".

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    #8

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Opposite John works better for me than opposite to John. The "to" is superfluous.
    Opposite to is not used much in BrE either.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    And I'm very surprised that Skrej deemed 10 correct. "Opposite from" is very unnatural in BrE.

    I'd accept:
    He sat opposite John.
    He sat on the opposite side of the table to John.
    He sat on the opposite side of the table from John.
    He sat at the opposite end of the table to John.
    He sat at the opposite end of the table from John.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Expressing the position: the other end

    "Opposite from" is probably non-standard, but it doesn't make me cringe like "off of the table".

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