Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Venezuela
      • Current Location:
      • Venezuela

    • Join Date: Jul 2016
    • Posts: 16
    #1

    To pick up - to lift something

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDymUu92cwo

    I was watching this lesson and, I've always had a doubt about when to use the object in the middle of the phrasal verb and next to the phrasal verb.

    He said 1) then 2)
    1) "tom picked up the newspaper"
    2) "could you pick your socks up?"

    see how the object in the 1st is after the phrasal verb and in the 2d the object is in the middle of the phrasal verb, at first sight I can say that because is a question the object is placed in the middle but I've seen this form in other prasal verbs that aren't questions.. so what's the secret?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,492
    #2

    Re: To pick up - to lift something

    1) "Tom picked up the newspaper."
    2) "Could you pick your socks up?"
    You can also say "Tom picked the newspaper up', and 'Could you pick up your socks?'

    It makes no difference whether it's a question or a statement.

    There's no secret. Some phrasal verbs are separable and some are inseparable; 'pick up' is separable.

    Click here to read more.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 237
    #3

    Re: To pick up - to lift something

    These little complements (sometimes called 'particles') can come either between the verb and its object, or after the object, in both statements and questions:

    1. Tom picked up the newspaper ~ Tom didn't pick up the newspaper ~ Did Tom pick up the newspaper?
    2. Tom picked the newspaper up ~ Tom didn't pick the newspaper up ~ Did Tom pick the newspaper up?

    In the 1. examples the particle "up" occurs between the verb and its object, and in the 2. examples it occurs after the object.

    It's a free choice; whichever you prefer is fine.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Venezuela
      • Current Location:
      • Venezuela

    • Join Date: Jul 2016
    • Posts: 16
    #4

    Re: To pick up - to lift something

    Separable and Inseparable Phrasal Verbs

    Wow you just open a new door for me, I had no idea about this, thank you sir :D

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,492
    #5

    Re: To pick up - to lift something

    Quote Originally Posted by drop90 View Post

    Wow! You just opened a new door for me. I had no idea about this. Thank you, sir. :D
    Please don't use home-made emoticons to replace standard punctuation marks. If you want to insert a smiley, click on the icon and choose from the selection available.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] pick up/ pick off/ nail down
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Apr-2010, 18:17
  2. [Grammar] Opposite word for "lift" or "lift up"
    By Snappy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Nov-2009, 14:48
  3. Take the lift down to -2
    By Bobette in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Apr-2006, 19:44

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •