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    #1

    put on notice

    I'm pretty sure I can say 'to put an individual on notice'. But can I say 'to put on notice an individual'?

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    #2

    Re: put on notice

    It doesn't sound natural to me at all but we would need, as always, a complete sentence to consider.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: put on notice

    "He's bound to put a public individual, who has power to appoint or remove from office, on notice."

    OR

    "He's bound to put on notice a public individual who has power to appoint or remove from office."
    Last edited by ostap77; 01-Sep-2016 at 23:53.

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    #4

    Re: put on notice

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "He's bound to put a public individual, who has power to appoint or remove from notice, on notice."

    OR

    "He's bound to put on notice a public individual who has power to appoint or remove from office."
    Either option is possible. Sentence 1 would be poor style because it repeats notice with two different meanings. This sentence would be okay: He's bound to put a public individual, who has the power to make appointments, on notice.

    The choice of where to write on notice depends on the length of the sentence. Here are shorter versions of your sentences:

    He's bound to put someone on notice.OK.
    He's bound to put on notice someone. No.
    He's bound to put on notice someone with hiring and firing authority. OK.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: put on notice

    Sorry for the typo. I was going to write '...remove from office.", plus I have another related question.
    Is it mandatory to write the definite article as in "...,who has the power to make appointments."? Could I just leave it out?
    The reason I'm asking is that I came across the following sentence.
    "The board of directors has given her power to negotiate the contract." Why is it not '...given her the power to negotiate the contract.'?
    Last edited by ostap77; 02-Sep-2016 at 00:04.

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    #6

    Re: put on notice

    The definite article is optional in that context. I prefer its inclusion.

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