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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    The stand reinvents new service ritual

    There's a sentence: The stand reinvents the Mot & Chandon tie as a bold and eye-catching new service ritual that holds four delicately stemmed, footless champagne flutes.

    If to cut off the high-flown language the sentence comes to this one: The stand reinvents new service ritual.

    My understanding of the phrase is like this: the stand that holds champagne flutes creates again some kind of a new ceremony. But it doesn't make any sense for me.
    Could you help me to understand this sentence correctly, please.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 02-Sep-2016 at 07:31. Reason: Removed formatting to make font readable

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    #2

    Re: The stand reinvents new service ritual

    It's flowery marketing verbiage whose purpose is to impress the reader rather than convey information. The author wants the reader to imagine a "service ritual" as an elegant thing well worth its inflated price. I imagine (and hope) that the author invented the term.

    You can replace service ritual with "thingamajig" to get this equally meaningful sentence: ​The stand reinvents the tie as a thingamajig.
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    #3

    Re: The stand reinvents new service ritual

    The core sentence is "Stand reinvents tie."

    I don't know what a Moet & Chandon tie is, so I don't know how it is being reinvented.

    But the point is clear that they are using some sort of device to hold glasses which can not stand on their own ("footless"). This contraption and its use is part of the "prestige" you get when ordering this drink. If you just order a draft beer there is no ritual or special contraptions.

    Read "service ritual" as "gimmick."
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 02-Sep-2016 at 12:21. Reason: Fixing typo.

  2. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: The stand reinvents new service ritual

    Many thanks to your quick replies! Your explanations certainly clear things up! But these's still at least one question that burns me. What does service mean in this context? Should it be interpreted as a complete set of glasses for use at table?
    And one more question. What Maison is in this sentence: The Mot & Chandon black tie has elegantly dressed the Maisons legendary champagne bottles since 1886. Who is it, or what is it?

    Just for the purpose of clarity here is the picture of the whole thing:

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: The stand reinvents new service ritual

    I take it to mean that this new (and, in my opinion, impractical) way of "serving" champagne. I know someone who has a similar stand with similar glasses. They're a real pain in the a*se - once you've got your drink, you can't put the glass down anywhere except back in the stand!
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 02-Sep-2016 at 19:55. Reason: Fixed typo
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: The stand reinvents new service ritual

    Quote Originally Posted by PapaJohns View Post
    What Maison is in this sentence: The Mot & Chandon black tie has elegantly dressed the Maison’s legendary champagne bottles since 1886. Who is it, or what is it?
    Maison is French for 'house'. In other words, the company first started using this black-tie emblem/logo on their bottles in 1886.

    From their webpage:
    This luxurious collection is inspired by one of Moet & Chandon’s most iconic emblems, the Mot & Chandon black tie, which has elegantly adorned its legendary champagne bottles since 1886, a hallmark of the House’s values of success and glamour since 1743.
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    #7

    Re: The stand reinvents new service ritual

    Quote Originally Posted by PapaJohns View Post
    the stand that holds champagne flutes creates again some kind of a new ceremony. But it doesn't make any sense for me.
    They do appear to be suggesting that sticking glasses in this stand is some sort of ceremonial experience, rather than just enjoying a glass of champagne. I doubt it makes that much sense to anyone outside the marketing team who created this flowery prose.

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