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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    Tom commited an accident and a murder.

    "Tom was involved in an accident." (it means that either Tom has caused the accident or he is a victim. Am I correct?)

    "Tom caused an accident." ( It means he commited the accident. Am I correct? I am not sure whether we can use caused or commit here.)

    "Tom has done an accident." Is it correct?

    "Tom has commited an accident or muder."

    "There is an accident case registered in the police station under Tom's name."

    Please check.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Tom commited an accident and a murder.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "Tom was involved in an accident." (it means that either Tom has caused the accident or he is a victim. Am I correct?)
    or both!

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "Tom caused an accident." ( It means he committed the accident. Am I correct? I am not sure whether we can use caused or commit here.)
    No, it's not natural to say "commit an accident."

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "Tom has done an accident." Is it correct?
    No, that's unnatural.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "Tom has committed an accident or (a) murder."
    See correction.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "There is an accident case registered in the police station under Tom's name."
    That sounds unusual; I'm not sure if accidents are "registered" or filed under people's names at police stations.

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    #3

    Re: Tom commited an accident and a murder.

    Okay, but Tom caused an accident is correct. Am I right?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 02-Sep-2016 at 17:46.

  4. teechar's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Tom commited an accident and a murder.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    Okay, but "Tom caused an accident" is correct. Am I right?
    Yes, that's fine.

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    #5

    Re: Tom commited an accident and a murder.

    Bear in mind that Tom might not have been involved in the accident that he caused. Imagine, for example, that Tom runs across the road without looking to see if there are any cars coming. He might make it across the road unscathed but a car coming down the road at that time might swerve to avoid Tom but crash into a parked car in the process. Tom caused the accident but he wasn't injured in any way and he might have already run round the corner and been out of sight, not even knowing about the car crash that resulted from his irresponsible action.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Tom commited an accident and a murder.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Bear in mind that Tom might not have been involved in the accident that he caused. Imagine, for example, that Tom runs across the road without looking to see if there are any cars coming. He might make it across the road unscathed but a car coming down the road at that time might swerve to avoid Tom but crash into a parked car in the process. Tom caused the accident but he wasn't injured in any way and he might have already run round the corner and been out of sight, not even knowing about the car crash that resulted from his irresponsible action.
    "Without looking to see if there are any cars coming." Without looking to see is quite strange to me. Can we say "without looking whether a car is coming towards him?" How about this "There is an accident case registered in the police station under Tom's name"?
    Last edited by tufguy; 03-Sep-2016 at 07:59.

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