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    #1

    the point is out?

    Child: This pencil is not writing.

    Parent: The point is out. You need to sharpen it.

    Do you describe it that way: the point is out? The pencil is not just dull. Its point is already used up and only the wooden part of the pencil touches the paper.
    Not a teacher.

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    #2

    Re: the point is out?

    Some suggestions:
    The point is [missing / blunt / worn away]
    It doesn't have a point [anymore]

    "The point is out" doesn't work for a pencil. It would work for a pen, however. "The pen is out", actually means the ink in it has run out, is empty. Usually, "run" in this usage is only applicable to a liquid, or something considered fluid or flowing in a linear fashion; like time, or toner in a laser printer, or gumballs in a dispenser, or sand in an hourglass.

  1. Skrej's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the point is out?

    I usually just refer to them as 'dull', even if worn down to the wood. Sometimes the lead breaks off up inside the wood, in which case they're 'broken'.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #4

    Re: the point is out?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    Sometimes the lead breaks off up inside the wood, in which case they're 'broken'.
    Sometimes the lead breaks off up inside the wood. Why do you need up here? Is it because you're referring to the part of the lead that is up from the point? Would the sentence mean a little differently without the up?

    Also, can you refer to the point as the tip?
    Not a teacher.

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: the point is out?

    Quote Originally Posted by curiousmarcus View Post
    Sometimes the lead breaks off up inside the wood. Why do you need up here? Is it because you're referring to the part of the lead that is up from the point?
    Yes, but 'up' isn't necessary. It's just as good without 'up'.

    Quote Originally Posted by curiousmarcus View Post
    Would the sentence mean a little differently have a different meaning/mean something different without the up?
    No.

    Quote Originally Posted by curiousmarcus View Post
    Also, can you refer to the point as the tip?
    Yes.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: the point is out?

    "This pencil is not writing" isn't natural in BrE. The pencil isn't trying to write; the person is trying to write with the pencil.

    Child: What's wrong with this pencil, mum? I can't write with it.
    Parent: It's blunt. You need to sharpen it.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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