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    #1

    Implying meaning

    Hi there!

    In the sentence below, which preposition would sound more assertive? Meaning that the definition that would follow is the correct one.

    To better understand this idiom you should check the definition for/of the word...

    Cheers,
    Tito

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Implying meaning

    'Of' should be correct according to http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/definition
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Implying meaning

    Matthew Wai nailed it. You can't say "...definition for the word".

    You could have "definition for" in a sentence such as, "We added a dye to the sample to provide better definition for scientists...".

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    #4

    Re: Implying meaning

    I'm not sure what you mean by more "assertive".

    Different prepositions have different uses. It depends on the sentence and situation. In this sentence, of is the best.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChinaDan View Post
    You can't say "...definition for the word".
    Conceivably, you could if say, the word in question doesn't already have one and the definition is intended for the word. Imagine one lexicographer talking to a colleague says, "We still need a definition for 'transphambulant.'

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    #5

    Re: Implying meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by more "assertive".

    Different prepositions have different uses. It depends on the sentence and situation. In this sentence, of is the best.



    Conceivably, you could if say, the word in question doesn't already have one and the definition is intended for the word. Imagine one lexicographer talking to a colleague says, "We still need a definition for 'transphambulant.'
    Ha! Having someone show me I'm wrong doesn't usually make me laugh. Kudos and thanks.

    But, a "trans-what-now?"

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