Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2012
    • Posts: 77
    #1

    not too difficult of a choice

    Hi folks,

    Could anybody comment on the use of "of" in the sentence: "Not too difficult of a choice, is it?" I think it should grammatically be "Not too difficult a choice, is it?" but some people do seem to use "of" in this kind of situation. I'd like to know whether it's acceptable or not and also why do they use it.

    Thanks in advance.

    emp0608

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,883
    #2

    Re: not too difficult of a choice

    In BrE, only "[It's] not too difficult a choice" is correct.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2016
    • Posts: 357
    #3

    Re: not too difficult of a choice

    Quote Originally Posted by emp0608 View Post
    ..."Not too difficult of a choice, is it?"...
    It is correct. I do not, however, have a clue how to explain why. My feeling is that this is a mode of speech beginning to fall out of favor. I would use this version, but it does not surprise me to see the current generation drop the "of".

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,883
    #4

    Re: not too difficult of a choice

    Here are the first two differences that I could think of in the use of "of" between BrE and AmE.

    BrE: It's not too difficult a choice.
    AmE: It's not too difficult of a choice.

    BrE: I have a couple of apples.
    AmE: I have a couple apples.
    I think someone here once said that the second version is only acceptable in colloquial AmE, not in formal writing.

    (Note that "a couple more" does not take "of" in either variant.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 10,010
    #5

    Re: not too difficult of a choice

    I think we have a thread on this somewhere, but I can't find it. It may be in one of the other forums I play on.

    ChinaDan uses the 'of' in the original sentence, but thinks it's falling out of favour. I would never use it (it seems extremely unnatural to me), but I have the impression that it's becoming more widespread.

    These different opinions may well be due to the fact that CD is American and I am British. The fact that he is a year (decade?) or three younger than I may not be irrelevant. I must also admit that, although most of my friends and family are British, and I spend probably 20% of my time in England, England has not been my country of domicile for seventeen years.

    I agree with ems's opinions on 'a couple'. When I started working with Americans (in about 1998), I assumed, in my normal tolerant way, that the first couple of Americans I heard not using 'of' had gone through an inferior training course. I now accept that it is natural and correct in AmE.

    I still don't like it, but have to concede (very reluctantly) that this may be just prejudice. I also have to admit (even more reluctantly) that my son (at least he was my son until I disowned him), a teacher of EFL, has been known to drop the 'of'.

  4. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,310
    #6

    Re: not too difficult of a choice

    I think there is a difference between 'correct', 'acceptable' and 'frequently heard (but still wrong)'.

    If not using 'of' is correct are we to assume that using it is incorrect? I've heard educated AmE speakers say 'a couple of...' so I tend to think that that is the correct way to say it.
    I am not a teacher

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #7

    Re: not too difficult of a choice

    I think the thread has morphed too quickly from "difficult of" (adjective) to "couple of" (noun).
    I'd never say 'of' with the adjective. "She's too ugly of a woman to dance with". "He's too weak of a man to lift this."
    Is there a grammatical justification for this usage?

Similar Threads

  1. [General] I find it difficult/It's difficult for me
    By kompstar in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 15-Feb-2015, 21:49
  2. [Grammar] giving choice or give choice
    By kesler in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-Oct-2014, 16:25
  3. more difficult than / difficult compared with
    By herbivorie in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2014, 18:53
  4. [Grammar] it is difficult (for us), we will find it /us difficult
    By uktous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Dec-2009, 00:53
  5. Release from a choice or free from a choice
    By José Manuel Rosón Bravo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-Mar-2007, 22:29

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •