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  1. Just Joined
    English Teacher
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    #1

    Who and That

    Hi, when using who and that in reference to a person or an object...Example:

    John is one of the workers who bring(s) his own tools.

    The verb "bring" is conjugated to "workers"...or is it conjugated to "one" and the prepositional phrase omits the word Workers as a subject... I would want to naturally say brings-with the S...but my book tells me that workers is the word WHO refers to so it should be plural. Confusing stuff!!
    Thanks a lot in advance

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    #2

    Re: Who and That

    Welcome to the forum.

    Say either

    'John is one of the workers who brings his own tools' or

    'John is one of the workers who bring their own tools.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Who and That

    I'm slightly confused by your title and first sentence, when taken in conjunction with the rest of your post. Was your question about whether you should use "who" or "that", or was it about the use of the plural?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Who and That

    Quote Originally Posted by willieesl View Post
    John is one of the workers who brings his own tools.
    While this is very common - no one will likely make an issue of you saying it - "bring their" is actually correct. I agree with your textbook.

    You could say, "John is a worker who brings his own tools". However, to use "brings his" in your first sentence, you have to break up, "one of the workers who". You can't do that.

    Put it this way:

    "There is a group of workers who bring their own tools; John is one of them".

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Who and That

    If you change the word order, you can change the meaning (as CD has done).
    "Of the workers, John is one who brings his own tools."
    I'd also suggest that, in speech, intonation can make a difference. Context also matters.

    A: "Do any of the workers bring their own tools?"
    B: "Let me think. John is one of the workers who brings his own tools. I'm not sure about the others."

    Having said that, I think that "John is one of the workers who bring their own tools" is the most common meaning, and the one most often written wrongly.

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