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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "anticipating (in?) any err"?



    My deepest apologies for anticipating any err in any email/message ever sent.

    My deepest apologies for anticipating in any err in any email/message ever sent.

    Are both sentences (with or without in) grammatically correct?







  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    "Err" is a verb. Are you sure that's the word you were looking for? You need the associated noun.

    Also, note that the use of "anticipating" makes no sense in either sentence, regardless of any preposition.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    Yes. That's the word I was looking for.

    b: to violate an accepted standard of conduct

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/err

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    Do you mean you anticipated that there would be errors?
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    Any aggressive behavior

  6. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    What has aggressive behaviour got to do with errors and anticipation?

  7. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    Odessa Dawn, do you mean aggressive behaviour is an error?
    I am not a teacher.

  8. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    The word err has multiple meanings as you can here. My intention is to use 2b:http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/err

  9. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    @ Matthew: not friendly, not showing respect ...

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: "anticipating (in?) any err"?

    It's still a verb and you can't apologise for or anticipate a/an + verb.

    I apologise for any errors in my email.
    I anticipate that there will be errors in my email, for which I apologise.
    I anticipate having to apologise for making errors in my email.

    Do any of those come close to your intended meaning?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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