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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bengali; Bangla
      • Home Country:
      • Bangladesh
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Sep 2016
    • Posts: 9
    #1

    Easy on the ice, easy on the salt

    What do "easy on the ice" and "easy on the salt" mean in the following:

    Waitress: Are you ready to order now?
    Maria: Yes. I'll have some salad, roast beef, and mashed potatoes.
    Waitress: How do you want the beef? Rare, medium, or well-done?
    Maria: Well-done. And easy on the salt, please.
    Waitress: Sure. Anything to drink?
    Maria: Do you have coffee or tea? I'd like decaf.
    Waitress: Yes, we have both. Which one would you like, coffee or tea?
    Maria: Iced tea, please. And easy on the ice.



    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,512
    #2

    Re: Easy on the ice, easy on the salt

    Welcome to the forum, amishera.

    This expression is mainly heard in North American English. 'Easy on something' means you don't want much of it.

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