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  1. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #1

    incomes and inequality fell over the course of the Roman Empire

    Dear friends,

    I'm currently reading a paper about globalization and inequlaity and I've got a question to you about the following sentence (given below):

    "...He seasons the discussion with interesting comments, such as how incomes and inequality fell over the course of the Roman Empire..."

    1) What is the meaning of "to season"? Does it mean "... He contributes to the discussion by making interesting comments"?

    2) What is the meaning of "fall over the course of ..."? Does it mean "come to contradiction"?

    Thanks

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: incomes and inequality fell over the course of the Roman Empire

    1. He added seasoning to the discussion (metaphorically).
    2. They declined over the time period during which the Roman Empire existed.

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    #3

    Re: incomes and inequality fell over the course of the Roman Empire

    When you "season" something, you scatter small bits of the tasty seasoning throughout the dish. His "interesting comments" were scattered nicely throughout the discussion.

    I'm inclined to agree with Raymott's response except for one thing, and it might be an error in the OP text. But by my reading, I don't think it evokes the right response if we replace "fell" with "declined" in reference to "inequality". "Income" - yes, but not the inequality. In this context, "declined" makes me think this is a negative thing, yet that doesn't fit with "inequality". "Fell" is a good choice; neutral so as to fit well with both lowering incomes (a bad thing) and lowering inequality (a good thing, surely).

    And the thing that makes me question the text; history shows us that as incomes fall (relative to inflation at least), inequality rises!

    If the text said "...incomes and equality fell...", then I'd be in 100% agreement with Raymott here.

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    #4

    Re: incomes and inequality fell over the course of the Roman Empire

    It does seem contradictory to me too, though the writer may explain how both income and inequality in the text. It's not the usual pattern.

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