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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
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      • India
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    #1

    I had chickenpox.

    "I had chickenpox when I was a kid, once you have it, you get immuned from it."

    "I have had chickenpox when I was a kid, once you have had it, you get immuned from it."

    "Have you ever had chicken pox in your entire life?"

    "Did you ever have chicken pox in your entire life?"

    Are these sentences correct? If yes, then could you please explain, what is the difference in their meanings?

    Please check.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I had chickenpox.

    The first two have a comma splice. You need 'become immune', not 'get immuned'.

    'I have had' is not correct in the second. You are talking about past time.

    The third and fourth don't need 'in your entire life'. That idea is included in 'ever'.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 19-Sep-2016 at 08:23.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I had chickenpox.

    Don't forget that it's perfectly possible to get chickenpox more than once. I know two people who had it as a child and then again as an adult. In the second case, it developed into the much more unpleasant and potentially dangerous shingles.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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