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    #1

    "too room-temperature"

    Hello,

    I wanted to know if I can turn the phrase 'room temperature' into an adjective to make the following phrase: Sue couldn't enjoy the drink, no matter how expensive Huge said it'd been. It was way too room-temperature for her taste and she winced, thinking back to home and how a cool Oklahoma beer would beat the high-class, colorfully fashionable concoction any day.

    If it's not possible, how could I rephrase it to express the same idea?

    I appreciate your help!

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    #2

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    How about "It was nowhere near cold enough?"
    Also, I suspect you mean Hugh.

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    #3

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    Indeed, I meant Hugh! I think that may work, yes, thank you:)

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    #4

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    You can't really be "too" room temperature. Room temperature is not an extreme.

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    #5

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    You can write too warm. This will contrast with the cool temperature that Sue prefers.

    If you were writing about a hot drink, you'd write too cool​ for the same reason.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    Note that I wrote warm and cool in my examples, not hot and cold. The reader will mentally set a scale where warm and cool are intermediate temperatures appropriate for the kind of thing you're writing about. A warm winter's day in my region might be in the forties or fifties Fahrenheit (roughly five to fifteen Celsius), but a warm summer day would be somewhere around eighty (27 C). A cool winter day would be moderately cold, say thirty to forty (-1 to 5 C); a cool summer night might get down to sixty (15 C).
    Last edited by GoesStation; 22-Sep-2016 at 03:59.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    Thank you so much! That's such great advice!

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    #8

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    I have to say that it sounds OK to me, but some English beers are served at room temperature and I dislike them. Beer should be very cold for me, so I get the issue.

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    #9

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    British pubs serve draught beer at cellar temperature: 50-55 degrees F/10-12.7 C.

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    #10

    Re: "too room-temperature"

    It doesn't make it taste any better to me. <lagerman>

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