Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Mar 2012
    • Posts: 138
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Gall

    A man is in his 40s.


    Another man who isin 20s told him something he did was not correct.


    It galls him to hearcriticism or advice from a young person.


    It galls him to hearcriticism or advice from a younger person.


    Smaller countrieshave no gall to criticize the US.

    Do you think my sentences are correct?

    Maybe you will not use the word gall the way I wrote.

    Does it exist -ing form? I mean the verb galling.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2016
    • Posts: 357
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Gall

    Quote Originally Posted by Tina3 View Post
    It galls him to hear criticism or advice from a young person.
    Correct.

    It galls him to hear criticism or advice from a younger person.
    Also correct.


    Smaller countries do not have the gall to criticize the US.
    Note how I rewrote this.

    Does it exist -ing form? I mean the verb galling.
    Click me => galling

  2. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Mar 2012
    • Posts: 138
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Gall

    He is galling me.
    It seems the above is incorrect.

    As a verb 'galling' does not exist.

    It exist as an adjective.

    Please let me know more about this.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2016
    • Posts: 357
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Gall

    "Galling" can be a verb or adjective.

    "This situation is galling me" - verb. Not something I hear often, but it is valid. At least, all the dictionaries list "gall" as a verb, and I find nothing at all to prohibit the present progressive tense.

    "This is a galling situation" - adjective. This is much more common usage.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 54,541
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Gall

    Quote Originally Posted by Tina3 View Post
    He is galling me.
    It seems the above is incorrect.
    It's not common. I would be more likely to use the verb when talking about what is irritating me than who. There are many more common ways of saying this, which is what makes it sound odd.

Similar Threads

  1. Draught of vinegar and gall ...
    By Johnyxxx in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Mar-2015, 16:00
  2. The nerve and the gall! mean?
    By shinem in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-Sep-2011, 09:57
  3. dip one's pen in gall
    By duiter in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2010, 10:02
  4. Gall
    By star_zb in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Nov-2005, 18:23

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •