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    #1

    has vs has been

    I not understand when to use who of them..

    for example :
    The dog has been sat there
    The dog has sat there

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    #2

    Re: has vs has been

    These are easier to answer if you ask complete sentences. I'll flesh them out to show the difference.

    The dog has been sitting there all day.
    The dog has sat there all day.

    Their meaning is the same. Somewhere around the start of the day, the dog sat "there", and he is still there now.

    The only difference is that the first sentence somewhat emphasises the duration of the activity, while the second just states the fact.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: has vs has been

    BrE uses "He's been sat there all day" to mean the same as "He's been sitting there all day".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: has vs has been

    On the other hand, to the question asked:
    "The dog has been sat there" means that someone has sat the dog there. Someone else put the dog there.
    "The dog has sat there" means that the dog sat there by himself. He did not need anyone to sit him there.
    The first is passive (something has been done to the dog); the second is active (the dog has done something).

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    #5

    Re: has vs has been

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    BrE uses "He's been sat there all day" to mean the same as "He's been sitting there all day".
    That's a usage that was non-standard when I was a child that has become standard.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: has vs has been

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    BrE uses "He's been sat there all day" to mean the same as "He's been sitting there all day".
    I've never heard of that. Does that extend to other verbs as well?
    Eg. "He's been stood there all day" = "He's been standing there all day"?
    "His wife's been cooked in the kitchen all day" = "His wife's been cooking in the kitchen all day."? (OK, I'm being a little facetious in that one). But is "sit" the only verb it works for?

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: has vs has been

    It's common with 'stood' in BrE.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: has vs has been

    Then may I say 'I have been learnt English for decades' to mean 'I have been learning English for decades'?
    I am not a teacher.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: has vs has been

    No. I tried very hard but I couldn't come up with any other verbs that work; just "stood" and "sat".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: has vs has been

    How about 'He has been lain all day'?
    'Stood', 'sat' and 'lain' are all attitudes.
    I am not a teacher.

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