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    #1

    Where were they making calls to.

    "The offices were closed on Sunday so where Tom and Tim were making calls to on Sunday?"

    Please check.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    The offices were closed on Sunday so who were Tim and Tom ringing on Sunday?

    I can't quite explain why but we generally don't say "where" when we're talking about a phone call. Generally, you're not phoning a place, you're phoning a person, even if you don't know who's going to answer the phone.

    You got the word order right in your title - Where were they making calls to?
    You got the word order wrong in your post - Where Tom and Tim were making calls to?

    That's a careless error. Clearly you know the right word order.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The offices were closed on Sunday so who were Tim and Tom ringing on Sunday?

    I can't quite explain why but we generally don't say "where" when we're talking about a phone call. Generally, you're not phoning a place, you're phoning a person, even if you don't know who's going to answer the phone.

    You got the word order right in your title - Where were they making calls to?
    You got the word order wrong in your post - Where Tom and Tim were making calls to?

    That's a careless error. Clearly you know the right word order.
    "Where were Tom and Tim making calls to?" Is it correct like this or are you saying that the word order is correct like this? But you are also saying that we don't use "where" when refering to phone calls.

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    #4

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "... were Tom and Tim making calls to?" Is it correct like this or are you saying that the word order is correct like this? But you are also saying that we don't use "where" when refering to phone calls.
    I was referring only to the word order, which I have now underlined above. That word order is correct. The word "where" was not natural, as I indicated in post #2.

    "Making calls to" is also rather unnatural. I'd use either "ringing" or "phoning".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Making calls to" is also rather unnatural. I'd use either "ringing" or "phoning".
    making calls to is certainly not "unnatural". I think ringing is a little dated these days. I would use calling.

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    #6

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    making calls to is certainly not "unnatural". I think ringing is a little dated these days. I would use calling.
    Okay, "Who were they calling?"

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    #7

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    That's right. So how would you now write your original sentence?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    making calls to is certainly not "unnatural". I think ringing is a little dated these days. I would use calling.
    Poor choice of word on my part. It sounds a little too formal to my ears. I was about to say that perhaps our opinion on "ringing" differs due to variant differences - for some reason I thought you were an AmE speaker - but I now see we're both BrE speakers. I use "phone/ring" much more frequently than "call".

    I'll ring you Monday, Mum.
    Your mate John rang while you were out. He said to phone him back asap!
    Sorry I missed your call. Why were you ringing? (I would use "call" as the noun, of course.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    emsr2d2 -- I didn't mean to suggest that to ring somebody is outdated. I know several people who use it in the same way as you. It's just that those people are of a more advanced age than most. Perhaps it's because those users picked up their use of this word back when phones literally did ring. I don't think I ever hear anybody under the age of forty-ish use it. That's why it I said it seems dated to me.

    Anyway, despite to ring somebody being still very much a part of BrE, I think that the transitive verb to call somebody is a much preferable verb to suggest to L2 learners as it is very easy to understand and very common across all registers, dialects and world regions.

    Of course, I still use and teach the intransitive to ring (e.g. Your phone's ringing.) for want of any alternative.

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    #10

    Re: Where were they making calls to.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That's right. So how would you now write your original sentence?
    "The offices were closed on Sunday so who were Tom and Tim calling/ringing on Sunday?"

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