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    #1

    What is "turn on a pinhead"

    I watched this video about people in Corolado thinks about Donald Trump,
    at the very last the journalist said: "this is an election that could turn on a pinhead"

    what does this mean? thanks!

    video link is here: https://www.facebook.com/theguardian...type=2&theater

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What is "turn on a pinhead"

    Quote Originally Posted by didagwen View Post
    I watched this video about ​what people in Corolado Colorado thinks think about Donald Trump.
    At the very last end, the journalist said (no colon here) "This is an election that could turn on a pinhead."

    What does this mean? Thanks!

    The video link is here: https://www.facebook.com/theguardian...type=2&theater
    Please note my corrections above. It's important to start every sentence with a capital letter and add every sentence with one, appropriate punctuation mark.

    It's not a standard idiom but a pin head (the head of a pin) is very small so the suggestion is that the presidential election will be very close; the two candidates will probably get similar numbers of votes.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: What is "turn on a pinhead"

    The similar American expression to turn on a dime means "to turn suddenly". A dime is the physically smallest American coin, worth a tenth of a dollar. I imagine it puzzles foreign visitors, who wonder how much it's worth (it doesn't say) and why it's smaller than the penny, which is worth one tenth as much.
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  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What is "turn on a pinhead"

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I imagine it puzzles foreign visitors, who wonder how much it's worth (it doesn't say) and why it's smaller than the penny
    Even when we are told that it's a dime, that doesn't mean much unless we know that that's worth two nickels. That you sometimes call a cent a penny just adds to the fun.

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    #5

    Re: What is "turn on a pinhead"

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Even when we are told that it's a dime, that doesn't mean much unless we know that that's worth two nickels. That you sometimes call a cent a penny just adds to the fun.
    We always call our one-cent piece a penny. Only the penny ("one cent") and nickel ("five cents") actually say how many cents they're worth. The ten-cent piece mysteriously proclaims its value as "ONE DIME", and the twenty-five cent piece tells its holder that it is a "QUARTER DOLLAR". The little-used fifty-cent piece adheres to this proud tradition.

    None of our coins are labeled with crass numerals.
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  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: What is "turn on a pinhead"

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    . The ten-cent piece mysteriously proclaims its value as "ONE DIME"
    That's because the American system was originally truly a decimal system. Well, it still is, though the mills have vanished.

    1 dollar - 10 Dimes (tenths)
    1 dime - 10 cents (hundredths)
    1 cent - 10 mills (thousandths)

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    #7

    Re: What is "turn on a pinhead"

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    That's because the American system was originally truly a decimal system. Well, it still is, though the mills have vanished.

    1 dollar - 10 Dimes (tenths)
    1 dime - 10 cents (hundredths)
    1 cent - 10 mills (thousandths)
    Mils still exist. They have only one l (I suppose because they can't afford more). Property tax levies are denominated in mils per dollar of assessed value, at least in my state.
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    #8

    Re: What is "turn on a pinhead"

    It never occurred to me till now, but I suppose it was consistent that even when we had coins worth less than a cent, they were denominated in fractions of a cent rather than multiples of a mil.
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    #9

    Re: What is "turn on a pinhead"

    Calling someone a "pinhead" is an insult. So I think there is some word play here where the write is taking the idea of turning on a dime while also calling one or both of the candidates "pinheads."

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