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    #1

    will travel to... here is my ticket

    Hi,

    "I will travel to Uruguay next week. Here it is my ticket."

    A firend of mine told me that I cannot use 'will' in the blank but can use only 'am going to.' Unfortunately, I could not understad why. Could you tell me why?

    Thanks.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: will travel to... here is my ticket

    Quote Originally Posted by ademoglu View Post
    "I will travel to Uruguay next week. Here it is my ticket."
    When what you are saying about a future situation is based on present evidence (in this case, the ticket), then BE going to is the normal way of expressing futurity. It's also common to use the present progressive to talk about something that has been arranged.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 03-Oct-2016 at 19:11.

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    #3

    Re: will travel to... here is my ticket

    Quote Originally Posted by ademoglu View Post
    "I will travel to Uruguay next week. Here it is my ticket."
    Except for removing "it", this sentence is fine. "Will" is functioning exactly the same as "am going to" would in this context.

    I disagree with your friend.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: will travel to... here is my ticket

    Quote Originally Posted by ChinaDan View Post
    "Will" is functioning exactly the same as "am going to" would in this context.
    I don't really think that a modal and BE going to can be said to function in exactly the same way in any context. While the former very often, and the latter almost always (except when the to is not part of a to- infinitive) convey an idea of futurity, each also conveys other shades of meaning. Will normally suggests volition or certainty, BE going to present evidence of the future situation. While there are without doubt contexts in which either is possible, this does not mean that they are functioning in exactly the same way.

    I disagree with your friend.
    I would say that the friend is wrong to say that you cannot use will in that utterance, but most native speakers would use Be going to or the present progressive in this context, in which they are showing their ticket.

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    #5

    Re: will travel to... here is my ticket

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I don't really think that a modal and BE going to can be said to function in exactly the same way in any context. While the former very often, and the latter almost always (except when the to is not part of a to- infinitive) convey an idea of futurity, each also conveys other shades of meaning. Will normally suggests volition or certainty, BE going to present evidence of the future situation. While there are without doubt contexts in which either is possible, this does not mean that they are functioning in exactly the same way.

    I would say that the friend is wrong to say that you cannot use will in that utterance, but most native speakers would use Be going to or the present progressive in this context, in which they are showing their ticket.
    I heard you the first time, and I still disagree with you. The grammatical details withstanding, in this context the message and meaning are the same. AND it is a perfectly normal thing for a native speaker to say.

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    #6

    Re: will travel to... here is my ticket

    Throughout my time on this forum, the perceived difference between "will" and "am/is/are going to" has been a complete mystery to me. Of course, there are some instances where only one or the other is correct, but in general, I find them interchangeable. The only difference for me is that I expect non-native speakers to use "will" more often because that is frequently the nice, simple version they have been taught to express the future.

    I will go to the shops later.
    I am going to the shops later.

    I will eat my dinner at 7pm.
    I am going to eat my dinner at 7pm.

    She will buy four pairs of shoes.
    She is going to buy four pairs of shoes.

    For me, the two sentences in each pair mean exactly the same as each other, with no difference in certainty or amount of planning. I would use the second. Some people (especially learners) would use the first.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: will travel to... here is my ticket

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Throughout my time on this forum, the perceived difference between "will" and "am/is/are going to" has been a complete mystery to me
    Few native speakers could explain convincingly whey they select one form rather than another. Indeed, the choice is rarely a conscious one. Descriptive grammarians, after examining many utterances containing the form(s) they are interested in, attempt to explain why one form may be more likely, or even the only correct one. Their explanations have become sounder since computer-generated corpora of millions of words have become available. These explanations are usually of little interest to native speakers themselves - they choose the more natural form(s) automatically - but they can be very useful to teachers and learners of EFL/ESL.

    Of course, there are some instances where only one or the other is correct, but in general, I find them interchangeable.
    They are often interchangeable to the extent that either is correct and may be used. That does not mean that they convey exactly the same shades of meaning. 'House' (or 'flat/appartment) and 'home' are sometimes interchangeable, but native speakers will generally not choose one when the other is more likely.

    The only difference for me is that I expect non-native speakers to use "will" more often because that is frequently the nice, simple version they have been taught to express the future.
    This is partly a consequence of the still widely-held belief 'will' forms the future tense in English.

    For me, the two sentences in each pair mean exactly the same as each other, with no difference in certainty or amount of planning. I would use the second. Some people (especially learners) would use the first.
    The fact that you would use the second and not the first suggests there is some difference, though single sentences do not often provide enough context so be sure. This is why the learners' use of 'will' sounds non-native in some contexts.

    Unfortunately, many grammar exercise of the 'Choose the correct way of expressing the future in the following sentences' are often misleading. In the context of a single sentence, more than one form is possible, as I showed in my 'Emma (see) Luke tomorrow' example in this article.

    I also said in that article:

    In many sentences, several of the forms can be used perfectly naturally. The final subconscious choice of form is made by speakers at the moment of speaking, and depends on the context of situation as they see it at that moment. Do not think that there is one, and only one, ‘correct’ form in any given situation.

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    #8

    Re: will travel to... here is my ticket

    No disrespect to anyone but I'm very surprised to hear language teachers say that there is no difference in meaning between these two future forms!

    I'm just thinking that perhaps any disagreement or misunderstandings among us might possibly come from what we mean by "the same meaning''. Is this the same as saying "the same message" or "the same usage"? Is it possible to say that two forms have the same meaning but different uses?

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    #9

    Re: will travel to... here is my ticket

    Sorry for the "necropost"; I've been unwell.

    I think the simple answer to your question, Jutfrank, is that while the basic message is, in fact, the same, there is a subtle difference in the level of commitment to this future action on the part of the speaker. To that extent, I must agree with Piscean's assertions. However, it is very subtle, and likely one only a native speaker (or very advanced L2 speaker) would be capable of making.

    I probably shouldn't have allowed myself to be moved to say "exactly" when describing the similarity between "will" and "am". Too, I have been one to make such fine distinctions in my other posts. I didn't deem that detail important in this case. Perhaps I was wrong.


    1. In this context, both "will" and "am" have the same meaning; a statement of future intent.
    2. There may be a subtle difference in so far as the level of commitment to this future on the part of the speaker.

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