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    #1

    Question The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    Hi,

    Is it correct to say that "the cuckoo clock strikes on the hour"?

    I looked it up in a dictionary, but it was as "The clock strikes the hour and not "on" the hour". So can we use "on"?
    Thanks in advance.

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    #2

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    Quote Originally Posted by Venus.jam View Post
    Is it correct to say that "the cuckoo clock strikes on the hour"?
    Not really. It isn't the natural way we say it, even though it seems odd to say that anything can actually "strike the hour".

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    #3

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChinaDan View Post
    Not really. It isn't the natural way we say it, even though it seems odd to say that anything can actually "strike the hour".
    So you mean the correct way is to say "the cuckoo clock strikes the hour"?
    excuse me, what do you mean by "anything can actually "strike the hour"?

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    #4

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    Quote Originally Posted by Venus.jam View Post
    So you mean the correct way is to say "the cuckoo clock strikes the hour"?
    excuse me, what do you mean by "anything can actually "strike the hour"?
    "The cuckoo clock strikes the hour" is the correct way to say this. But it does sound ridiculous, doesn't it? How can you strike an hour, since an hour has no substance? If I "give you an hour", do you have something in your hands now? No, I've simply stated I'm willing to wait for another 60 minutes for you.

    I'm just saying that I understand your initial confusion about this phrase, "strike the hour". It is rather odd, but it is correct.

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    #5

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    I have no problem with "the clock strikes on the hour and on the half hour."

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    #6

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    Yes — let's leave out 'cuckoo', a special type of clock which goes cuckoo on the hour.

    Consider 'The clock chimes on the hour'.

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    #7

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    On the hour is idiomatic in AmE, at least, for an event that occurs at 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, etc. Every hour on the hour​ means that this happens twenty-four hours a day.

    I find the clock strikes the hour​ possible but a little odd.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    In old-fashioned language, the clock strikes the hour, be that (the hour of) one/two/three...

    The clock struck one
    The mouse ran down
    Hickory-dickory-dock

    In more modern parlance, an event may be said to occur on the hour.

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    #9

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    I would use "on the hour" if I were talking about the habitual action "This clock strikes on the hour [and the half-hour]".
    I would use "the hour" if I were talking about one instance - "The church clock had just struck the hour when the ghostly form of my deceased grandfather appeared".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: The cuckoo clock strikes on the hour.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would use "on the hour" if I were talking about the habitual action "This clock strikes on the hour [and the half-hour]".
    I would use "the hour" if I were talking about one instance - "The church clock had just struck the hour when the ghostly form of my deceased grandfather appeared".
    Hi,

    Thank you for all the answers that I recieved. But, putting these answers together confused me. In fact, I considered "the clock strikes on the hour" as a wrong sentence, based on the first reply that I recieved. I also checked it in a dictionary and I noticed that "the clock strikes the hour" is correct. But then I was told that both "the clock strikes the hour" and "the clock strikes on the hour" are correct. So, are both correct?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 07-Oct-2016 at 18:02. Reason: Deleting superfluous question marks.

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