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    #1

    My friend and I or me and my friend.

    "Diane said something about me and my friend or my friend and I?"

    Please check.

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    #2

    Re: My friend and I or me and my friend.

    Diane said something about my friend and me.

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    #3

    Re: My friend and I or me and my friend.

    AmE-speakers will usually say to my friend and I even though "me" is grammatically correct. You should learn the correct usage, but don't be surprised to see native speakers use the other one.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 06-Oct-2016 at 00:46. Reason: Insert a missing word.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: My friend and I or me and my friend.

    I don't agree that it's "usual."

    I hear a ridiculous amount of "Between you and I" but overall, I find a lot more use of the "me" as a subject than "I" as the object.

    I DO agree you'll hear it, but not that it's the more common form.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: My friend and I or me and my friend.

    I am confused because "My friend and I were present there" and "She said something about my friend and me." These two sentences are quite similar but different.

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    #6

    Re: My friend and I or me and my friend.

    I was present.
    My friend and I were present.

    She said something about me.
    She said something about my friend and
    me.

    Do you see a difference now?

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    #7

    Re: My friend and I or me and my friend.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    These two sentences are quite similar but different.
    Think what you'd say if my friend weren't in the sentence, and use that form. You wouldn't say me went or she told I, so simply add the part about your friend to the correct forms.

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    #8

    Re: My friend and I or me and my friend.

    NOT A TEACHER

    Hello, Tufguy:

    I often hear American speakers say something like "This secret is just between you and I."

    You, however, will never make a mistake like that if you memorize one easy rule: After a preposition, you ALWAYS use the objective form of the pronoun.

    You know, of course, that "me" is the objective form of "I."

    Thus:

    "Mona said something about Tony and me / her / him / us / them."

    "Mona gave a gift to Tony and me."

    "Mona baked a cake for Betty and me."

    "Mona received a gift from George, Susan, and me."

    "Mona graduated from college after him, her, and me."

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