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    #1

    Scant stick or Two

    Hello,

    Does the bold text means "the publicity had not been lavish but, at least, allowed her to buy a piece or two of furniture?"

    Most likely she would get to know their models. Doubtless the sculptor, Fanshawe, was acquainted with them and would introduce her. There was even restrained mention of her (though to be sure ‘publicity’, running to a scant ‘stick’ or two, had not been lavish) in four papers. Vaguely, she had regarded her modelship, as a portal to success.

    John Metcalfe, Not There, 1948

    Thank you.
    Not a Teacher

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Scant stick or Two

    It seems unlikely. 'Stick' seems to be referring to some unit or type of publicity (possibly just the mention of her name). Let's see if others know more than I.

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