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    #1

    Bar (except for)

    Hi,

    Is bar (except for) still used in modern English?

    Thanks.
    Not a Teacher

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    #2

    Re: Bar

    I see it as a BrE usage, except for the fixed phrase bar none​ which is reasonably common in AmE.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Bar

    It is, in 'bar one' or, 'bar none'.


    Other than that, I'd say not really.
    I am not a teacher

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Bar

    Yes, in the form of "barring" usually, which I feel means "unless" more than "except for."

    http://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=barring&l=0

    Here are some phrases using "barring."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Bar

    I am asking because I have seen it only in an older literature.

    Chains are useless; nothing keeps a man still. Bar anaesthesia. And anaesthesia is the
    one thing barred. (Aleister Crowley, The Soul-Hunter, 1908)

    Angela had always admitted, but distinctly preferable to nothing. For those few clippings were all that remained to her of the one episode that had relieved three decades and a half of drudgery—the only piece of ‘luck’ or colour (bar the legacy) that she had known. (Not There, J. Metcalfe, 1948)

    Thanks for your replies.
    Not a Teacher

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    #6

    Re: Bar

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    It is, in 'bar one' or, 'bar none'.


    Other than that, I'd say not really.
    The Economist​ uses it pretty often. I don't suppose their usage is representative of British usage as a whole, though.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: Bar

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnyxxx View Post
    I am asking because I have seen it only in an older literature.

    Chains are useless; nothing keeps a man still. Bar anaesthesia. And anaesthesia is the
    one thing barred. (Aleister Crowley, The Soul-Hunter, 1908)
    This Crowley quote sounds dated to me. It is used in modern BrE, but not that much, and I agree that barring is more common.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Bar

    I also want to firmly agree that "bar none" is a rather common use.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: Bar

    Yes, it's still used fairly commonly -- I've just seen it in a blog I was reading.

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