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    #1

    "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    Please structure it better.

    Thank you.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    Do the department personnel work there at night?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    Will the department personnel be there now? It's eight o'clock.

    We are far more likely to specify a time than to say that the sun has set or that it is nighttime. We would not use any version of 'night has fallen' in this context, and we would not use 'as'.

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    #4

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    Thank you. But we won't know 'time' everytime. How do we say it, then? For example I am in a crop field, where time is not known at all.

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    #5

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    If you're working out in a crop field, are you likely to need to know about "department personnel"? The two contexts don't seem to fit very well together.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    How about using "as it's getting dark" and "as it's already dark"?

    Thank you.

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    #7

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    Quote Originally Posted by MeyaN View Post
    Thank you. But we won't know 'time' everytime. How do we say it, then? For example I am in a crop field, where time is not known at all.
    Then no-one else who you could ask your question to would know either.

    You: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"
    Hearer
    : "Yes, I know it has. But I am also in the crop fields, and have no better idea than you whether they will be there yet. We both know that that they arrive once night has fallen, so your guess is as good as mine."

    You haven't given us a context where the question makes sense.

    PS: "Night has fallen already, and the departmental personnel should be there. Would you check that they are, please? I need to talk to them."
    Last edited by Raymott; 11-Oct-2016 at 11:36.

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    #8

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    Thank you.

    I meant to ask, we say "He is going", "He's gone", "She will be coming". But for night, afternoon, evening, we don't say "evening is coming", "Night has come"(to which I asked if night has fallen could be used). So how do make up for this shortcoming?

    Piscean replied with "We don't use 'night has fallen', 'the sun has set', but we specify time". And since we may not be sure what the time is some times(say, we are in a swimming pool where we can't have wrist watches, or playing a sport etc), I asked how would we say the sentence without knowing the time.

    Please tell me if still there is any ambiguity or I goofed up things and correct if there are any mistakes in this post. And please answer too.
    Last edited by MeyaN; 11-Oct-2016 at 15:17.

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    #9

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    Yes, we do say, "Evening is coming", "Night has come" and similar phrases, when appropriate.
    No, Piscean said, "in this context". Since we didn't have an understandable context, you can probably ignore what Piscean said, if you have an understandable and discussable context - in which we can certainly say, "Night has fallen".

    Man to Woman on internet: "Has night fallen yet where you are?"
    Woman: "It's not completely dark, but the stars are coming out. A cold night is coming."

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    #10

    Re: "Will the department personnel be there, as the night has already fallen?"

    Thank you so much for your explanation and example. You gave a beautiful example. It almost sums it up all.

    Could you please tell how 'afternoon' and 'evening' are used.

    And, is the originally posted question is fine? Or does it need some restructuring?

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