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    #1

    They say it as "don't", but I'm not sure...

    In the video http://www.ted.com/talks/john_lloyd_...ge=en#t-592626 at 2:36 there is a phrase "I bet he thought he wished he was invisible ...". What is he saying at the end? "Let him"? What's the exact pronounciation?

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    #2

    Re: They say it as "don't", but I'm not sure...

    "I bet he thought-- he wished he was invisible, don't you?"

    The speaker pronounces the n't as a nasal followed by glottal stop. This is one common way to say it. Americans would be more likely to pronounce don't you like /d/ followed by "own chew", though we also use the nasal glottal stop pronunciation.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 11-Oct-2016 at 16:34. Reason: To expound on pronunciation.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: They say it as "don't", but I'm not sure...

    Thank you! Сould you give me the exact transcription of "don't you" as he's pronouncing it?

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    #4

    Re: They say it as "don't", but I'm not sure...

    Quote Originally Posted by transletter1 View Post
    Thank you! Сould you give me the exact transcription of "don't you" as he's pronouncing it?
    I don't know how to do phonetic transcriptions, sorry.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: They say it as "don't", but I'm not sure...

    And what about "ain't he?" instead of "don't you"? Is it possible here?

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    #6

    Re: They say it as "don't", but I'm not sure...

    Do you mean, if he hadn't said "don't you", could he say ain't he? No, that wouldn't make sense and wouldn't fit with the register of English he's using.
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    #7

    Re: They say it as "don't", but I'm not sure...

    As a substitute for have not or has not and—occasionally in Southern speech— do not, does not, and did not, it is nonstandard except in similar humorous uses: You ain't heard nothin' yet!
    http://www.dictionary.com/browse/ain-t?s=t

    It is humorous video, isn't it? :)

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    #8

    Re: They say it as "don't", but I'm not sure...

    He says "I bet he thought-- he wished he was invisible, don't you?" Ain't he wouldn't make sense at the end of that statement. He's addressing the audience, so the pronoun you is the only one possible, and ain't can't substitute for "don't".

    Besides, he very clearly says "don't".
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