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    #1

    She can always give freely of her time to others.

    Hi,

    1) She can always give freely her time to others.
    2) She can always give her time freely to others.
    3) She can always given freely of her time to others.

    Are they correct? Kindly explain the relevance and meaning of 'of' in the third sentence.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: is 'of' required?

    When a verb follows a modal, it has to be a bare infinitive. Therefore, number 3 doesn't work. Number 1 is unnatural, but number 2 is OK.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: is 'of' required?

    I wonder if "given" in #3 was a typo.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: is 'of' required?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I wonder if "given" in #3 was a typo.
    Good point. Number 3 would be correct if the verb were give. Including of emphasizes the value of the gift a little.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: is 'of' required?

    She is always readily available to help others.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: is 'of' required?

    That's fine, ted, but it's not what the OP asked about, and it doesn't mean exactly the same as the OP's sentences.

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    #7

    Re: is 'of' required?

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    That's fine, ted, but it's not what the OP asked about, and it doesn't mean exactly the same as the OP's sentences.
    I would interpret "giving one's time to others" as an indirect way of saying "helping others". What else can it mean?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: is 'of' required?

    '3) She can always give(n) freely of her time to others.' - the "given" is definitely a typo for "give" as pointed out. Sorry about it.

    My point is whether it doesn't convey the same meaning without 'of'. If it adds some more meaning, what is it or what is not without it?. Kindly clarify it grammatically also.


  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: is 'of' required?

    If you keep the word order but omit "of", you get a grammatically incorrect sentence. We wouldn't say:

    She can always give freely her time to others.

    Mind you, I find starting with "She can" unnatural in this context anyway. It seems more likely to me that we would talk about a habitual action someone already has in this context. "She gives her time freely for others".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: is 'of' required?

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    I would interpret "giving one's time to others" as an indirect way of saying "helping others". What else can it mean?
    You can help others without giving up any of your time.

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