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  1. VIP Member
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    #1

    A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    That person is in a very deep sleep. It could be possible that he might have missed his stop.

    Please check.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    Are you planning to use all four sentences together to describe one situation? If so, that's far too much information. The first sentence suffices and would be correct if you changed "in" to "on".
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 03-Nov-2016 at 08:38. Reason: Fixed typo
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Are you planning to use all four sentences together to describe one situation. If so, that's far too much information. The first sentence suffices and would be correct if you changed "in" to "on".
    Is anything wrong with second one?

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    "It could be possible that he might have missed his stop."
    "It is possible that he has missed his stop."

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    #5

    Re: A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "It could be possible that he might have missed his stop."
    "It is possible that he has missed his stop."
    Sorry to bother you but could you please tell me whether you just shortened the sentence or there was a problem with my sentence?

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    Both. You don't need all those words.
    You don't mean it could be possible. You mean that it is possible, or that he could have missed his stop. You don't need both.
    If it's possible that he might have missed his stop, then it's possible that he has missed his stop.

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    #7

    Re: A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Both. You don't need all those words.
    You don't mean it could be possible. You mean that it is possible, or that he could have missed his stop. You don't need both.
    If it's possible that he might have missed his stop, then it's possible that he has missed his stop.
    Okay so "it could be possible" is a wrong sentence and shouldn't be used.

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    #8

    Re: A guy was sleeping in the bus and missed his stop. He went past his stop.

    "It could be possible" means "It's possible that it's possible". You don't need it in this case.

    Here is a correct use. Humans can't fly on Earth, but it could be possible on a planet with less gravity."

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