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Thread: Serviette

  1. #1

    Smile Serviette

    Dear Teacher,

    Please tell me the meaning of "Serviette" and how to pronounce it?

    Thanking you,

    Murli

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Serviette

    It means, table napkin, and it was borrowed into English from French.

    Pronunication: sir-V-et
    V as in the letter "V"
    et as in pet

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Serviette

    Just an addendum to Cassie's response...."serviette" has no meaning in the U.S. It's strictly called a "napkin" here.

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #4

    Re: Serviette

    British snobs hate the word 'serviette' and think it's vulgar.

  5. #5

    Smile Re: Serviette

    Tdol, Editor

    A school teacher wrote in one of her students' personal diary, marked to the parents.

    Thank you all for your sincere response. It really makes me proud of being a learner through this website.

    Murli

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #6

    Re: Serviette

    It's one of the words that the British snobs dislike, though I am not supporting their position. Others include 'ketchup' and 'toilet', neither of which worries me.

  7. #7

    Re: Serviette

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It's one of the words that the British snobs dislike, though I am not supporting their position. Others include 'ketchup' and 'toilet', neither of which worries me.
    So, what are the equivalent words they use for these
    two words?

    My guess - 'WC' or 'loo' for 'toilet'?
    Last edited by englishstudent; 06-Jul-2006 at 17:13.

  8. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Serviette

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It's one of the words that the British snobs dislike, though I am not supporting their position. Others include 'ketchup' and 'toilet', neither of which worries me.
    I'm trying to think of what else they might call "ketchup"....(I'm hoping it's not "tomahto sauce"...)

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #9

    Re: Serviette

    Napkin, lavatory and tomato sauce, I believe- I'm not one of them, though I don't say 'serviette'. Ouisch, it would be a very long tomahhhhhto sauce.

  10. #10

    Wink Re: Serviette

    Dear Editor,

    I am happy that my query evinced interest among the readers. Of course, your explanation too is excellent.

    thanking you,

    Murli

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