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Thread: two-meter high

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    #1

    two-meter high

    Is it correct to say this is a two meter height wall?

    Or we can just say this is a two meter high well?

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    #2

    Re: two-meter high

    This is a two-meter high wall.
    This wall is two meters in height.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: two-meter high

    Quote Originally Posted by tulipflower View Post
    Is it correct to say 'This is a two meter height wall'? No.

    Or can we just say 'This is a two meter high wall'?
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    This is a two[no hyphen]meter high wall.

    This wall is two meters in height. ​This is grammatical but not natural, Matthew.
    This wall is two metres high.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 06-Nov-2016 at 09:09.

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    #4

    Re: two-meter high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    This is a two[no hyphen]meter high wall.
    I am confused because a hyphen is used in 'a ten-foot high statue' ── quoted from http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/high
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: two-meter high

    Fair enough.

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    #6

    Re: two-meter high

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I am confused because a hyphen is used in 'a ten-foot high statue' ── quoted from http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/high
    That's correct. We hyphenate when the two (or more) words are used together as an adjective. We also remove the pluralising "s" from the end of the noun involved.

    The wall is two metres high.
    It is a two-metre high wall.

    The boy is six years old.
    He is a six-year-old boy.

    The bed is six feet long.
    It's a six-foot long bed.

    As you can see in the last one, changing the plural back to the singular completely changes the word, from "feet" to "foot". It's an irregular plural.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: two-meter high

    I'd be even inclined to apply another hyphen in:
    It is a two-metre-high wall.
    It's a six-foot-long bed.

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    #8

    Re: two-meter high

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    I'd be even inclined to apply another hyphen in:
    It is a two-metre-high wall.
    It's a six-foot-long bed.
    That's how I'd write it, too. The hyphenated ensemble is a compound adjective.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #9

    Re: two-meter high

    Absolutely right. I was concentrating so much on the "six-foot" part of it that I neglected to continue hyphenating where it was necessary. Thanks.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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