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    #1

    Should and Might have done.

    "If you had known, you should have helped". It is a suggestion here. If it is a suggestion then "If he had taken the 8:30 flight he should have reached here before midnight" is it just a suggestion as well?

    If I had known, I might have helped. In this the speaker is saying that whether he had helped or not if he had known. But he might have gone is a different expression than "I might have helped". Am I correct?

    Please check.

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    #2

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    I think 'should have done', 'might have done', and 'would have done' refer to a past expectation, a past possibility, and a past certainty respectively.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "If you had known, you should have helped".
    Write If you knew, you should have helped.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Write If you knew, you should have helped.
    I read this sentence "You had known, you should have helped" in the link provided by Piscean. Is it incorrect?

    "If you knew, you should help" is it correct?

    I read one more sentence there "If I had time, I should learn this language" what does the should clause mean here?

    I know the meaning of "Should have done" but what does it mean in the sentence that I have mentioned in post 1?

    As I am trying to understand these things they are getting more complicated. Please help.
    Last edited by tufguy; 08-Nov-2016 at 07:56.

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    #5

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    If we are talking about a past-time failure to go. "If you knew" gives the distinct impression that you did know; "If you had known" tells us that you did not know.

    A: I knew he was ill, but I didn't have time to go.
    B: If you knew, you should have gone.

    I didn't know he was ill. I am not sure I would have gone even if I had known.
    B: If you had known, you should have go
    ne.

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    #6

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "If you had known, you should have helped". It is a suggestion here. If it is a suggestion then "If he had taken the 8:30 flight he should have reached here before midnight" is it just a suggestion as well?
    No, in your second sentence 'should' is used differently. It's an expectation.

    1. "You have a meeting at 9 am. Therefore, you should be at the office by 9 am." - obligation, suggestion.
    2. "If you leave now, you should be at the office by 9 am." - expectation.

    [This is definitely enough material for one thread, tufguy.]

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    #7

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No, in your second sentence 'should' is used differently. It's an expectation.

    1. "You have a meeting at 9 am. Therefore, you should be at the office by 9 am." - obligation, suggestion.
    2. "If you leave now, you should be at the office by 9 am." - expectation.

    [This is definitely enough material for one thread, tufguy.]
    But in my second sentence it is clear that it is a speculation right? He didn't take the flight.

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    #8

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    Are you asking about "If he had taken the 8:30 flight he should have reached here before midnight"?



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    #9

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    If we are talking about a past-time failure to go. "If you knew" gives the distinct impression that you did know; "If you had known" tells us that you did not know.

    A: I knew he was ill, but I didn't have time to go.
    B: If you knew, you should have gone.

    I didn't know he was ill. I am not sure I would have gone even if I had known.
    B: If you had known, you should have go
    ne.
    "If you knew" it is not a second conditional sentence here right? but what about that sentence "If I had the time, I should learn Hindi" is it also an expectation here?
    Last edited by tufguy; 09-Nov-2016 at 07:34.

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    #10

    Re: Should and Might have done.

    You have ignored my question and asked a different one, yet again. How many times have we asked to to deal with one thing at a time? This thread is in danger of becoming as confusing as some of your others. I'll leave you to it.

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