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  1. Member
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    #1

    What's the difference between "I'm shocked." and "I'm in shock."?

    I've studied English since I'd like to speak English like native speakers do.
    I usually don't care which I use, but I'd like to know their subtle nuances.

    How and when do you use each phrase? Or are these interchangeable?

    Thank you.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What's the difference between "I'm shocked." and "I'm in shock."?

    If you are shocked, you have an emotional feeling of being very surprised or upset. If you are in shock, you are in a medical condition, feeling weak and cold, for example after an accident, or after receiving very bad news.

    Some people are in shock after receiving the news of Trump's election, but most who say they are are exaggerating. They are actually just shocked.

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: What's the difference between "I'm shocked." and "I'm in shock."?

    I'm in shock is common in everyday speech, though. It emphasizes the ongoing nature of the feeling of being shocked.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Member
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    #4

    Re: What's the difference between "I'm shocked." and "I'm in shock."?

    Sorry, it took a while to come back here.

    Thanks to the example of Trump's election, I understand their usuage well.
    I also understand that "in shock" is casually used in every day speech.

    Thank both of you.

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