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  1. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
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      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
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    #1

    Run out of (something).

    We have already discussed the expressions like "fall short of" and "fall short by" in one of my previous threads and I have also been told other inflections like "run short of" are also used else where in the world but "run short of" is quite unnatural.

    Now, is it natural to use "run out of (something)" in the united States, Britain, Australia and other parts of the world where English is use as first language?

    Note: I know that this expression has slightly different meaning. It means when you have completely consumed something that you had earlier.

    Regards
    Aamir the Global Citizen

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
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      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • UK
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      • UK

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    #2

    Re: Run out of (something).

    It's used extensively in BrE to mean that you have none left.

    We've run out of milk.
    We've run out of printer ink.
    I've run out of money.

    We use it in the present continuous as well to show that there is not much left.

    We're running out of milk. Can you buy some later?
    The printer ink is running out. Please order five cartridges.
    I'm running out of money. I'll have to go to the cashpoint soon.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
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      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
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    • Join Date: Dec 2015
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    #3

    Re: Run out of (something).

    It's natural and common in AmE. I'm certain the same applies to every place where English is a first language.
    I am not a teacher.

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