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    #1

    He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    "This fast" can't be used. Am I correct?

    Please check.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    The whole sentence doesn't work. "He runs faster than any professional runner" is the best and simplest way to say it. However, it seems somewhat unlikely. If he's that fast, he'd be a professional athlete!

    You have misspelt "quickly" twice.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    ...and "doesn't" twice.

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    #4

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    "This fast" can't be used. Am I correct?
    Yes, you're right.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The whole sentence doesn't work. "He runs faster than any professional runner" is the best and simplest way to say it. However, it seems somewhat unlikely. If he's that fast, he'd be a professional athlete!

    You have misspelt "quickly" twice.
    Sorry for the mistakes. Okay we can say it like this but is my sentence absolutely wrong? I would like to know what is the elaborated version of this sentence?

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    What do mean by "elaborated version"?

    Grammatically, your original sentence contains no errors but it's unnatural. There is a big difference between a grammatically correct sentence and a sentence that any native speaker would ever use. As I pointed out in post #2, it's an unlikely scenario. I will stick my neck out and say that someone who runs faster than all professional runners doesn't actually exist.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    Can we say such thing in hyperbolic manner?

    He lifts weights so proficiently that even a professional lifter doesn't lift like that. What would be the natural way to say this? He lifts weights more proficiently than professionals.

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    #8

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    "Lifting weights proficiently" doesn't work. Do you mean that he can lift heavier weights than any professional lifter?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    Can we say such thing in hyperbolic manner?
    Certainly. Here's an example: I know more about ISIS than the generals do, believe me.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: He runs so quickley that even a professional runner doen't run so fast.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Lifting weights proficiently" doesn't work. Do you mean that he can lift heavier weights than any professional lifter?
    Yes and the way he lifts is flawless.

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