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  1. meraviglioso's Avatar
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    #1

    "For not considering" vs "For not having considered"

    Hello,
    could someone be so kind as to explain to me the difference between the following two forms:

    1) "I am sorry for not having considered....."

    2)" I am sorry for not considering...."


    They sound pretty similar to me. I mean, they both refer to something which I didn't do OR having done so far = "not considering...."

    Thank you all!

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "For not considering" vs "For not having considered"

    I'd use #2 but #1 is not wrong.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. meraviglioso's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "For not considering" vs "For not having considered"

    Can both be used interchangeably?

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    #4

    Re: "For not considering" vs "For not having considered"

    I can't answer that without knowing how the sentence ends.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "For not considering" vs "For not having considered"

    No. A context and a full sentence is necessary to say which is more appropriate.
    The perfect tense 1) is more likely for something in the past, finished with. It's more important in good writing.

    "I'm sorry for not being with my mother when she died".
    "I'm sorry for not having been with my mother when she died." - Better.

    Which of the below would you use? (assuming my translator and my memory are right)
    "Mi dispiace di non decidere le tue vacanze.
    "Mi dispiace di non aver deciso le tue vacanze."

  6. meraviglioso's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "For not considering" vs "For not having considered"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I can't answer that without knowing how the sentence ends.
    So, let's assume the sentences ends as follows:


    1) "I am sorry for not having considered the fact that you are allergic to nuts"

    2)" I am sorry for not considering the fact that you are allergic to nuts"

    So, can they be used interchangeably?


    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No. A context and a full sentence is necessary to say which is more appropriate.
    The perfect tense 1) is more likely for something in the past, finished with. It's more important in good writing.

    "I'm sorry for not being with my mother when she died".
    "I'm sorry for not having been with my mother when she died." - Better.
    In fact, my two sentences could relate to something happened in the past = e.g. There was a party and I prepared a meal which contained nuts as one fo the ingredients so I forgot that one of my guests is allergic to nuts.

    So, both forms would work well, though, based on your opinion, the second one would be more appropriate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Which of the below would you use? (assuming my translator and my memory are right)
    "Mi dispiace di non decidere le tue vacanze.
    "Mi dispiace di non aver deciso le tue vacanze."
    "decidere le tue vacanze" does not work well.
    But if we replace the verb "decidere" with "tenere conto di" (consider/take into consideration that..)

    1) Mi dispiace di non tenere conto delle tue vacanze

    2) Mi dispiace di non aver tenuto conto delle tue vacanze

    Of course they have two different meanings.
    The first implies that "I am not considering your vacation and I know I am not doing it, although I could still change it"
    The second means more that I am apologising for not considering/ not having considered your vacation

    So, the second one is something which refers to the past. But as you can see, again, I could say both "not considering" and "not having considered".
    So the question still applies Can they be used interchangeably?

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "For not considering" vs "For not having considered"

    Yes, you probably can use either. It's more of a stylistic choice. You would't be too wrong if you picked the stylistically less-preferred choice. But I am always reluctance to say that two terms are interchangeable unless I myself would use them that way.

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    #8

    Re: "For not considering" vs "For not having considered"

    That's right. We are all reluctant to say constructions are interchangeable in all contexts.

    The minute we do, some smarty-pants comes along and proves us wrong.

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