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  1. Narkises's Avatar
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    #1

    future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    Hi,
    Although I know what is the difference between the tenses future perfect and future progressive perfect, I cannot choose which tense would appropriate for gaps like these:

    "I know by the end of May, we...... the house for two months." (Paint)
    "I know by the end of May, we....for several weeks." (Paint)
    "By the end of the summer, you..... for several weeks." (Travel)

    As my book says: The first sentense needs future perfect, and the third one needs future perfect progressive. I am totally mixed up. My face looks like a big Question Mark!
    Please correct my mistakes if you encounter any.

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    #2

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    Paint is an odd choice of verbs for the first two questions. You could say "we will have been painting the house for two months", meaning that you've spent two months continuously painting the house. This seems rather unlikely. Or, you could say "we will have had the house painted for two months", meaning that the house-painting was finished two months before the end of May. I don't think the author was looking for that response though.

    The future perfect progressive works for the third question. "By the end of the summer, you will have been traveling for several weeks" is true (and correct) if you're going to start traveling in July or early August. The state of traveling will be continuous; you will continuously engage in it until the reference time. Thus, if it's September first, you will be able to say "I have been traveling for several weeks." Switching from the present perfect progressive to the future perfect progressive casts this condition into the future.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 20-Nov-2016 at 20:22. Reason: To fix a typo.
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  3. Narkises's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    Thats too difficult to understand.
    Please correct my mistakes if you encounter any.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Narkises View Post
    Thats too difficult to understand.
    And that is a rather ungracious response when GS spent time trying to help you.

  5. Narkises's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    I don't understand your intention. Did you mean he should not have helped me?
    Please correct my mistakes if you encounter any.

  6. Narkises's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    I really didn't mean to say that GoStation had wasted his time. I tried to understand,but my confusion is still bugging me.
    Please correct my mistakes if you encounter any.

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    #7

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Paint is an odd choice of verbs for the first two questions. You could say "we will have been painting the house for two months", meaning that you've spent two months continuously painting the house. This seems rather unlikely. Or, you could say "we will have had the house painted for two months", meaning that the house-painting was finished two months before the end of May. I don't think the author was looking for that response though.

    The future perfect progressive works for the the third question. "By the end of the summer, you will have been traveling for several weeks" is true (and correct) if you're going to start traveling in July or early August. The state of traveling will be continuous; you will continuously engage in it until the reference time. Thus, if it's September first, you will be able to say "I have been traveling for several weeks." Switching from the present perfect progressive to the future perfect progressive casts this condition into the future.
    Quote Originally Posted by Narkises View Post
    Thats too difficult to understand.
    I was afraid my explanation might have been too complicated. Piscean's remark means he thinks your reply would have been more polite if you had also thanked me for trying to explain this, or apologized for not understanding. Something like I'm sorry but I can't understand this.

    In my first paragraph I said it's hard to use paint logically in the test question.

    I'll try to rephrase my second paragraph. Imagine it's September 1st. I meet you somewhere and say "You look tired." You answer "I am. I have been traveling for several weeks."*

    Now imagine we're talking about what you plan to do next summer. I ask about your situation on September 1st. You answer, "I will have been traveling for several weeks."

    *You should really say I've been traveling.​ It's more natural.
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  8. Narkises's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    Oh, I'm so sorry. I was struggling so hard that I've forgotten to thank you. Right. You allocated a lot of time to answer me. That was a great help. I really thank you.
    I need to read your first post again. I hope I can understand that finally.
    Please correct my mistakes if you encounter any.

  9. Narkises's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    "I know by the end of May, we will have painted the house for two months."
    I have problems with this sentence.
    Please correct my mistakes if you encounter any.

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    #10

    Re: future perfect VS. future progressive perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Narkises View Post
    "I know by the end of May, we will have painted the house for two months."
    I have problems with this sentence.
    Me too. It's incorrect. Only a continuous (or "progressive") tense works there.

    You could say I know that by the end of May, we will have painted the house. It's the "for two months" that makes the future perfect wrong. Use the future perfect to describe something which will be complete in the sentence's time frame.

    When the word "perfect" was first applied to tense names, it meant complete. In many cases you can use that fact to help understand what the tense conveys: a completed action.
    I am not a teacher.

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