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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    there goes the + noun

    there: Used in attracting someone's attention or calling attention to someone or something.
    ‘there goes the phone’
    ‘Oh, there goes the doorbell, get that, will you, poor person?’
    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/there
    What does the structure there goes the + noun mean?
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #2

    Re: there goes the + noun

    It means something's happening regarding the thing.

    There goes the phone! = the phone's ringing.
    There goes the train! = the train's passing, probably the one we wanted to catch.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: there goes the + noun

    It can also mean other things.

    Some idea, plan, etc. has come to an end because of something happening.
    "It's raining. There goes the outdoor barbeque we were planning." (Nothing has really happened to the bbq in this case).
    "I failed maths. There goes my chance of a scholarship."

    Something is lost. "There goes my everything":
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCOpWTvM04w

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    #4

    Re: there goes the + noun

    NOT A TEACHER


    Hello, Sitifan:

    When I saw your thread title, I immediately remembered something that I had read a few days ago (I cannot find the source).


    1. Some students are talking outside. Just then Mr. Smith walks by them. One student points to Mr. Smith and tells the others: "There goes the best teacher in the school!"

    a. "There" is stressed (pronounced strongly in speech). It is an adverb (of place).

    2. Some students are talking in the cafeteria. Mona says that she has heard that Ms. Jones, the algebra teacher, is transferring to another school. Raul says, "Oh, no! Well, there goes the best teacher in the school."

    a. "There" is NOT stressed. It is NOT an adverb. It is only an introductory word.

    b. In Raul's opinion, the best teacher in the school is leaving.

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