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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    freezing in tissues that do not successfully vitrify

    Failed to understand " freezing in tissues that do not successfully vitrify."

    Oxford says "vitrify" means "[intransitive, transitive]vitrify (something)(specialist)to change or make something change into glass, or a substance like glass."

    Make tissues change into glass? It sounds really confusing to me.

    What does it mean?


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    Revival

    Those who believe that revival may someday be possible generally look toward advanced bioengineering, molecular nanotechnology,[48] or nanomedicine[20] as key technologies. Revival would require repairing damage from lack of oxygen, cryoprotectant toxicity, thermal stress (fracturing), freezing in tissues that do not successfully vitrify, and reversing the effects that caused death. In many cases extensive tissue regeneration would be necessary.[49]

    Source

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: freezing in tissues that do not successfully vitrify

    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTaste View Post

    Make tissues change into glass?
    Frozen tissues become something like glass.

    You can see this yourself at a very crude level. A sheet of ice (frozen water) on a lake resembles glass in some ways. It is hard, smooth and transparent, and it shatters easily.

    Revival would require repairing damage from [...],
    freezing in tissues that do not successfully vitrify,

    Reviving bodies would require repairing damage that has been caused by the act of freezing that has been carried out in tissues that do not successfully change into a glass-like substance.

    If you place a pea in a freezer. it becomes as hard and brittle (though not as transparent) as glass. If you thaw it, you have a pea that is very much like the original.
    If you place a raspberry in a freezer, it becomes as hard and brittle as glass. If you thaw it, you have a rather mushy raspberry. Some of the structure of the raspberry has been damaged in the freeing process.

    Human sperm can be frozen successfully. Some human cells are damaged by freezing.

    If Raymott comes into this thread, he will be able to give a more scientifically accurate response.

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #3

    Re: freezing in tissues that do not successfully vitrify

    Some things freeze well, but others don't. If you freeze an entire body, you are freezing a complex set of organs, and not everything will freeze perfectly.

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