Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: He is a friend.

  1. xiaoen's Avatar
    Banned
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Mar 2015
    • Posts: 228
    #1

    He is a friend.

    Hello,
    Once I asked my two little student to make a sentence example with the word "friend".

    One of them said: "He is my friend." (without pointing a finger to anyone in the class)

    The second one said: "He is a friend." (without pointing a finger to anyone in the class)


    Isn't the blue sentence odd without [my, your, his, her, etc]? Can we consider the blue sentence wrong?

  2. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 25,880
    #2

    Re: He is a friend.

    No - they are both grammatically correct sentences, which is all you asked for.

    'He is friend' would have been wrong.

    [In your post, move the full stops (periods) from within the quoted text to outside the parentheses.]

  3. xiaoen's Avatar
    Banned
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Mar 2015
    • Posts: 228
    #3

    Re: He is a friend.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    [In your post, move the full stops (periods) from within the quoted text to outside the parentheses.]
    Excuse me I didn't understand your meaning. Would you please show me what you mean exactly?

    Do you mean this?

    (without pointing a finger to anyone in the class)
    (without pointing a finger to anyone in the class).

  4. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 25,880
    #4

    Re: He is a friend.

    One of them said "He is a friend" (without pointing at anyone in the class).

    Note that I have made some other slight changes to show you how I would have written it.

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 60,656
    #5

    Re: He is a friend.

    Quote Originally Posted by xiaoen View Post
    (without pointing a finger to anyone in the class)
    Without pointing at anyone in the class works better for me- we usually point with our fingers, so it's giving no extra information.

  6. xiaoen's Avatar
    Banned
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Mar 2015
    • Posts: 228
    #6

    Re: He is a friend.

    Thank you but why do you use "at" instead of "to" for "point"?

    Point at
    Point to

    What's the difference?

  7. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 11,586
    #7

    Re: He is a friend.

    Quote Originally Posted by xiaoen View Post
    Thank you but why do you use "at" instead of "to" for "point"?

    Point at
    Point to

    What's the difference?
    Certain verbs change meaning depending on the preposition that follows them. The phrasal verb point at is one of them. It means "point in the direction of".
    I am not a teacher.

  8. xiaoen's Avatar
    Banned
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Mar 2015
    • Posts: 228
    #8

    Re: He is a friend.

    Excuse me I couldn't understand your meaning that why "point to" doesn't work in my context.

    When should we use "point to" and when "point at"?

  9. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 11,586
    #9

    Re: He is a friend.

    Here are some pages that a Google search for 'phrasal verb "point to"' finds. Please study the first few to see if they make its meaning clear.
    I am not a teacher.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Jul-2015, 14:11
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Jan-2015, 11:35
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Oct-2014, 14:39
  4. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-Jun-2014, 03:14
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Nov-2006, 19:32

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •