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  1. Junior Member
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      • Native Language:
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      • South Korea
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    • Join Date: Mar 2016
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    #1

    "He turned in his seat to look directly at her..."

    Although I seemingly figure out the meaning of 'turned in' by guessing it in the context, I'm still wondering how the preposition 'in' is related to the subject(he) and the object(his seat). From my knowledge, 'in' is a preposition which usually tells us the connection with space between the subject and the object. So, if I put 'he turned in his seat' in more comprehensive way, it might be, as far as I can see, 'he turned while stayed(or sit) in his seat'. I'd really happy to hear your comments. Thank you.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "He turned in his seat to look directly at her..."

    "He turned in his seat" is a shorter way of saying "He turned around while sitting in his seat".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Junior Member
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    #3

    Re: "He turned in his seat to look directly at her..."

    Thank you emsr2d2. I googled the phrase and got a lot of examples. So I think it is kind of usual expression but there is no dictionary which defines it. Little surprised.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "He turned in his seat to look directly at her..."

    You won't find every sentence uttered by native speakers in a dictionary.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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