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  1. Key Member
    Interested in Language
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    #1

    about to be proud of warning

    Hello.

    Now, this is not aggression. They are not ganging up on you, but are being brave and facing their potential threat. They are like children now, excited and about to be proud of warning mum that they have spotted you.

    Does "..... about to be proud of warning ... mean "..... they will be proud that they have warned ..."?

    What is your opinion?

    Thank you.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: about to be proud of warning

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Hello.

    Now, this is not aggression. They are not ganging up on you [No comma. It's not a compound sentence.] but are being brave and facing their potential threat. They are like children now, excited and about to be proud of warning [Mum. Capitalize it if it's being used as a proper noun.] that they have spotted you.

    Does "..... about to be proud of warning ... mean "..... they will be proud that they have warned ..." [Sort of. See comments below.]

    What is your opinion?

    Thank you.
    They will be proud in the near future. They will soon be proud. They are going to be proud soon. They are on the verge of being proud. Once they have warned their mother, they will be proud.

    The idiom "about to" means that something will happen soon, immediately, right away:

    - I was about to phone you when you knocked on my door.
    - She grabbed the candle because it was about to fall over.
    - He didn't know it then, but he was about to make the most important decision of his life.
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 04-Dec-2016 at 17:24.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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