Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. Tide's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 53
    #1

    hi native speakers! please answer

    When do youy use <costly> instead of <ekspensive>?( sorry my key board didn't write the letter iks !)

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
    Key Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #2

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    I'm a native speaker in the US, and really the only time I'd use "costly" is perhaps in writing (not speaking), and only in non-finanacial terms (i.e. "The war in Iraq is proving costly in human lives.") When speaking of something that costs a lot of money, I always refer to it as "expensive."

  3. #3

    Talking Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    The two are pretty close.

    I would say expensive would tend to be more associated with money. Costly can be about money too but like Ouisch said is good for non-money related cost too.

    It depends on the context and the persons vocabulary I think. Costly is much more uncommon in everyday life.

    Money

    "That Rolex watch is a bit too expensive for me." WORKS WELL
    "That Rolex watch is a bit costly for me." WORKS

    Non-money

    "The army attack was expensive in terms of lives lost." WORKS
    "The army attack was costly in terms of lives lost." WORKS WELL
    Last edited by Saxonlight; 08-Jul-2006 at 00:10.

  4. RonBee's Avatar
    Moderator
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,551
    #4

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    I agree with the others. The word costly is more likely to be used where the implications are not necessarily monetary. Example:
    A supervisor's mistakes are costlier that those of a regular employee.
    Sincerely,

    RonBee

  5. Fazzu's Avatar
    Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tamil
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • Singapore

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 397
    #5

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Sir Ronbee,

    Isn't that "A supervisor's mistakes are costlier than those of a regular employee"?

    Sorry to bother,I'm a girl who likes to ask many questions especially on the usage of English.

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 60,208
    #6

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Yes, it's a typo and should be 'than'.

  7. Tide's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 53
    #7

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch
    I'm a native speaker in the US, and really the only time I'd use "costly" is perhaps in writing (not speaking), and only in non-finanacial terms (i.e. "The war in Iraq is proving costly in human lives.") When speaking of something that costs a lot of money, I always refer to it as "expensive."

    Thanks everybody especialy the American native!

  8. Fazzu's Avatar
    Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tamil
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • Singapore

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 397
    #8

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Thanks Tdol.I thought some grammar rules were behind it.

  9. Tide's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 53
    #9

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Quote Originally Posted by moallem
    When do youy use <costly> instead of <ekspensive>?( sorry my key board didn't write the letter iks !)

    By the way! When do you use ekcessive?(Remember that my keyboard doesnt write the letter iks!)

  10. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 60,208
    #10

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Whenever something passes a limit, it can be described as excessive, whether it's a vehicle's speed or the heat.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Similar Threads

  1. How do native speakers say the date 4/5 ?
    By amigo in forum Letter Writing
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 21-Jul-2009, 23:56
  2. Speaking with native speakers!
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 22-Aug-2005, 03:25

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •