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    #1

    to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    Hello,
    does the idiom "to jump over one's own shadow" exist in english language? Do english speakers understand this idiom?

    Looking forward for your replies!

    Thanks,

    Nadja

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nipos View Post
    Hello,
    Does the idiom "to jump over one's own shadow" exist in the English language? Do English speakers understand this idiom?

    I'm looking forward for to your replies!

    Thanks,

    Nadja
    Note my corrections above.

    That idiom does not exist. However, "to jump at one's own shadow" is used in BrE. It means that someone is easily surprised/startled/frightened.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Note my corrections above.

    That idiom does not exist. However, "to jump at one's own shadow" is used in BrE. It means that someone is easily surprised/startled/frightened.


    Thanks for your reply! Is there any idiom or could you may help me to find a way to express: to bring oneself's to do something; do something, that you normally would never do (because it's against your character). For example: A usually very proud man, who usually only relies on himself, needs to beg for help.

    I want to write a sentence like this: Because of the dangerous circumstances Andy is forced to "................." and beg Ryan for help.(Although he usually never asks for help).

    Do you have any idea?

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    #4

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    Your character is forced to swallow his pride and beg.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    You could also use the idiom to "act out of character", for all sorts of sentences of this kind.

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    #6

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eckaslike View Post
    You could also use the idiom to "act out of character", for all sorts of sentences of this kind.



    Thanks for your replies! What do you think about this idiom: Andy is forced to do something that go against the grain.
    Would it fit in our context as well?

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    #7

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nipos View Post
    Thanks for your replies! What do you think about this idiom: Andy is forced to do something that go against the grain.
    Would it fit in our context as well?
    The idiom you're looking for is swallow his pride,​ as I suggested above.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    The idiom you're looking for is swallow his pride,​ as I suggested above.
    Indeed, but I'm searching for some alternatives, that are a less specific. I mean, I want to avoid to say i straight away that he needs to swallow his pride, something a bit more implicit... (for example he has to surpass himself...).
    Thats why I wanted to try "to do something that goes against the grain"...

    Any ideas no that?

    Thanks a lot!

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    #9

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    That's not really relevant here, but the same expression is used in German too, to say the exact same thing. (Über seinen eigenen Schatten springen). I always love when there are such similarities.

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    #10

    Re: to jump over one's own shadow - is this english?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nipos View Post
    Indeed, but I'm searching for some alternatives, that are a less specific. I mean, I want to avoid to say i straight away that he needs to swallow his pride, something a bit more implicit... (for example he has to surpass himself...).
    Thats why I wanted to try "to do something that goes against the grain"...

    Any ideas no that?
    The old idiom take the bull by the horns might work. It means to summon up your courage and do something. My father always used to say that when he decided to stop waiting for a break in traffic and pull out ahead of someone who would have to slow down to let him in.
    I am not a teacher.

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