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Thread: Glottal stop

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Glottal stop

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    A friend who lived alternately in central Connecticut and Florida (her parents owned one of the Connecticut resorts!) talks like that.

    The final phoneme in can't is usually a glottal stop. That's all that distinguishes I can do it! (spoken emphatically) from I can't do it!
    Oh! There! I wasn't thinking about the end of the word, just the middle. Yes, you're absolutely right. Totally glottal. I mean GLOH-al!
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: Glottal stop

    PS - A lot of New Yorkers will get the T and get it hard on words like can't and what. But then they lose their R's and it all comes out even.

    One of the toughest things for people studying American English must be learning when T's are pronounced as D's.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #13

    Re: Glottal stop

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    In central Connecticut, there's absolutely no T in bottle - just that hiccup. I hear it here in Maine and elsewhere sometimes, too, but it's not as common.
    It's spreading in BrE far beyond its Cockney origins.

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    #14

    Re: Glottal stop

    About 20% of the consonants produced by my son (whom I have disowned) are glottal stops. His version of 'Peter('d) better get a bit of butter' is one of the seven horrors of the world. His 'Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper' can make a grown man weep.

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    #15

    Re: Glottal stop

    Prince Harry combines an odd mixture of public school long vowels with glottal stops.

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    #16

    Re: Glottal stop

    yeah, well e's a modern royal, innit?

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    #17

    Re: Glottal stop

    You could always try shoo'ing your son for his 'orrible pronunciation.

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