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    #1

    enter, entering or both

    ---Is Jack in the classroom?
    ---Maybe not. I saw him ____ the dining hall just now.
    A. entering
    B. enter
    C. to enter
    (a test question)
    The answer key is B. But I think A is also OK. What do you say?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by touchstone; 15-Dec-2016 at 14:15. Reason: correcting a typo: dinning → dining

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: enter, entering or both

    A and B are both correct. They mean the same in this context.
    I hope the original didn't say "dinning hall"

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    #3

    Re: enter, entering or both

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    A and B are both correct. They mean the same in this context.
    I hope the original didn't say "dinning hall"
    Thanks, Raymott. That's a typo. 'Dinning' should be dining.
    Last edited by touchstone; 16-Dec-2016 at 02:32.

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    #4

    Re: enter, entering or both

    What about the following question?
    --Is mike in the library?

    --Maybe. I saw him ___ out of the room with some books just now.
    A. going
    B. go
    C. to go
    D. went

    For this context, I think
    go is better than going because going out of the room is a very short action, you usually see the whole course. What do you say?
    Thanks.
    Last edited by touchstone; 16-Dec-2016 at 02:48.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: enter, entering or both

    It still means the same.
    To get a difference, you need a statement such as:
    "I saw Tom eating a horse" - Fine, that's possible.
    "I saw Tom eat a horse." - This implies you saw him eat the entire horse, and is not likely.

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