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  1. Banned
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    #1

    stopped in to a church

    "Stopped in to a church, I passed along the way."
    It's a quote from the song "California Dreamin'".
    Does it mean something like
    "I drove around with my car, then saw a church, parked my car, and then went on foot into the church."?

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: stopped in to a church

    Yes. The comma is there to mark the break between two lines. The sentence is more natural without it.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: stopped in to a church

    Quote Originally Posted by krisfromgermany View Post
    "Stopped in to a church, I passed along the way."
    It's a quote from the song "California Dreamin'".
    Does it mean something like
    "I drove around with my car, then saw a church, parked my car, and then went on foot into the church."?
    It's not about driving or parking. He might have been walking down the street or riding a horse or a bicycle. It just means he went into a church and stayed for a while - that is, he stopped - or stopped in.

    John Phillips wrote it to sound poetic, so it's not exactly how we'd normally say it. We'd usually say something like:

    - I stopped in at a church.
    - I stopped at a church.
    - I went into a church.

    But his word choice has proven to be strong and memorable - possibly BECAUSE he took some liberty with his language.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: stopped in to a church

    "I've been for a walk on a winter's day" rather shuts out the idea of cars, horses or bicycles.

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