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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    An expression 'Saturday-to-Monday'

    "I have brought a guest, Aunt Ray," Halsey said. "I want you to adopt him into your affections and your Saturday-to-Monday list. Let me present John Bailey, only you must call him Jack. In twelve hours he'll be calling you 'Aunt': I know him."

    It's from 'Circular Staircase' by Mary Roberts Reinhart. (1908)

    What does 'Saturday-to-Monday' really mean in the above paragraph?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 23-Dec-2016 at 09:50. Reason: Removed extra line breaks

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #2

    Re: An expression 'Saturday-to-Monday'

    I guess it means to accept him as a personal contact rather than a business one, though I have never heard the expression.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: An expression 'Saturday-to-Monday'

    Aunt Ray apparently provides a service from Saturday to Monday, and there is a list of clients (perhaps not actually written). If you are reading the book, you should be able to work out what Aunt Ray does in this period, or generally. It could be childcare, for example.

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    #4

    Re: An expression 'Saturday-to-Monday'

    I think it's more likely that idle ladies of the period made regular social calls (visits) every week. Certain days were reserved for the more or less intimate friends. From the brief excerpt, I'd surmise that they called on their closest friends on Saturday, Sunday, or Monday.
    I am not a teacher.

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