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    #1

    The clothsline and clothspin.

    You put up a clothsline between two ends to hang wet cloths on it. You put clothspins or prongs on your cloths so that they do not get blown over by the gust of wind. When the cloths have dried up you put off the clothspins take the cloths and hang the clothspins on clothsline.

    Please check.
    Last edited by tufguy; 27-Dec-2016 at 07:43.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    You put up a CLOTHESLINE between TWO ends to hang wet CLOTHES on it. You put CLOTHESPINS or prongs on your CLOTHES so that they do not get blown over by A gust of wind. When the CLOTHES have dried up you TAKE off the CLOTHESPINS, take the CLOTHES OFF THE LINE and hang the CLOTHESPINS on THE CLOTHESLINE.

    Please check.
    I wouldn't say the clothes have dried up. I would say the clothes are dry.

  3. Moderator
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    #3

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Note: AE clothespins = BE clothes pegs

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    I am so old I can remember when we used to dry our clothes that way.

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    #5

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    You're younger than me, and we still do.

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    #6

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    You hang the clothes out on the clotheslines (note the spelling) to dry. You secure the clothes on the lines using pegs. When the clothes are dry, you remove them and leave the pegs on the lines.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    You hang the clothes out on the clotheslines (note the spelling) to dry. You secure the clothes on the lines using pegs. When the clothes are dry, you remove them and leave the pegs on the lines.
    Agree with tedmc except that the lines are generally singular. I have never known a person who used more than one clothesline at a time.

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    #8

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    I wouldn't say the clothes have dried up. I would say the clothes are dry.
    Can we say "we take off the clothespins or pegs from the clothes or clothesline?"

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    #9

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    Can we say "we take off the clothespins or pegs from the clothes or clothesline?"
    Yes, "take off" is the same as "remove".
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #10

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    In British English, you could unpeg the washing/clothes.

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