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  1. Moderator
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    #11

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    I have never known a person who used more than one clothesline at a time.
    You do now ... me.

    (See How to Dry Your Washing by Peggy Tout.)

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    I remember removing the dry clothes from the clotheslines. (I'm pretty sure there were two.)

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #13

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    I'd use the singular for this, though there are clearly many lines:

    http://static.wixstatic.com/media/bd...0_0.00_jpg_srz

  4. VIP Member
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    #14

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    In British English, you could unpeg the washing/clothes.
    Can we say "we pegged the clothes after washing?"

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #15

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    I pegged the clothes on the line. (There's no need to say after washing- who pegs clothes out before washing?)

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #16

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    We dried clothes etc like this when I was a kid but we never left the pegs on the line after the drying had finished because the metal in the springs would go rusty if left out in the typical English weather!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Key Member
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    #17

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    We dried clothes etc like this when I was a kid but we never left the pegs on the line after the drying had finished because the metal in the springs would go rusty if left out in the typical English weather!
    Also, the plastic material which pegs are made of becomes brittle through prolonged exposure to the weather.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #18

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    When I was a child, the pegs were made of wood. They looked like this:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Clothes peg 1.jpg 
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    Before that, there were wooden ones without springs, which looked like this:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Clothes peg 2.jpg 
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ID:	2505

    I would have thought leaving the wooden ones out in wet weather wouldn't be a good idea either.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #19

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Aye, and before that we washed clothes in the river with two stones. Grand old days.

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #20

    Re: The clothsline and clothspin.

    Stones? You were lucky to have stones ...

    (Apologies for hijacking the thread but if you want a giggle, and some challenging accents, click HERE).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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