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Thread: Gerund Help

  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Gerund Help

    Hi everyone,

    I was reading a report on the internet, and I came across a question.

    One of the guys said: (1)"I'm committed to buying that car"
    But I know that the sentence: "I want to buy that car" is right too.

    My question is:
    Why do you have to use the gerund form in the first sentence ("I'm committed to buy that car" would be wrong) and you don't use it in the second sentence?


    Does anyone know a grammar rule that explains it?

    Thank you !

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Gerund Help

    In the first sentence. 'committed to' is one of those adjective+preposition combinations which is followed by a gerund. Gerunds (versus infinitives) follow prepositions.

    In the second sentence, you have the verb 'want' which has to be followed by an infinitive (versus a gerund).


    I recommend this extensive 3 part tutorial with exercises for more information.
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  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Smile Re: Gerund Help

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    In the first sentence. 'committed to' is one of those adjective+preposition combinations which is followed by a gerund. Gerunds (versus infinitives) follow prepositions.

    In the second sentence, you have the verb 'want' which has to be followed by an infinitive (versus a gerund).


    I recommend this extensive 3 part tutorial with exercises for more information.

    Ok, thanks for the recommendation !

    :)

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Gerund Help

    Quote Originally Posted by Felipe07 View Post
    OK, thanks for the recommendation! (Don't put a space before an exclamation mark.)

    :) Please don't try to make your own emoticons. Click on the icon in the toolbar and choose the appropriate one.
    See above. Note that there is no need to write a new post to say "Thank you". Simply click on the "Thank" button on any post you find helpful.
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